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What is the best type of wood you have used for your stove?

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It is impossible to list every type of hardwood let alone every type of wood in the world. However, we know from research that various types of wood are more appropriate for wood-burning stoves than others. Some of the types of wood to consider include:

 

Apple wood

While Apple wood is something more associated with construction and decorative timbers, it is actually a perfect fuel for wood-burning stoves. The fact it is a dense wood means that it burns relatively slowly but creates significant heat. It also emits a relaxing fragrance at the same time!

 

Ash wood

As the natural moisture level of ash wood is around 66% it does take some time to season to a moisture level of around 20%. As it is extremely common across the UK it is no surprise to learn that Ash wood is one of the more popular wood-burning stove fuels.

 

Blackthorn wood

While Blackthorn wood may not be the most well-known to the majority of the UK population, it is popular amongst stove users. The fact it is used to carve riding sticks and walking sticks shows it is an extremely durable hardwood. In common with many hardwood fuels, Blackthorn wood burns slowly, creates significant heat but thankfully minimal smoke.

 

Hawthorn wood

Like many hard woods, Hawthorn wood is probably more associated with construction and decorative furniture. It is commonly used in cabinets, boxes, tool handles and boat parts. However, the fact it is extremely dense, slow burning and creates significant heat makes it just perfect for wood-burning stoves.

 

Horse chestnut wood

Creating a strong flame and significant heat output, horse chestnut wood is one of the few hardwoods used solely for fuel purposes. As it is readily available across many parts of the UK it also offers excellent value for money.

 

Maple wood

While maybe not as common in the UK, as the US for example; Maple wood is an extremely hard material which is perfect for wood-burning stoves. It is probably more expensive than the likes of horse chestnut wood but may be something to consider.

 

Oak wood

Oak wood is probably one of the best-known types of wood in the UK and is commonly used in construction, flooring and even wine barrels. As this hardwood is relatively dense it burns relatively slowly but emits significant heat.

 

Sycamore wood

Commonly available across many parts of the UK, Sycamore wood is a type of hardwood which makes it perfect for wood-burning and multifuel stoves. The fact it has historically been used on boats, ships and the construction of timber frames perfectly illustrates its strength.

 

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Dry stuff .... Burnt all of the above by the way .

Edited by Stubby
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Horse chestnut dries to something that is not very dense, not a great wood for burning. Sycamore is plentiful and ok but not special.

Anything dry is very true but my favourites

Oak

False acacia

Holly (so long as someone else has dealt with the prickles)

Apple, quince

Ash

 

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2 hours ago, BowlandStoves said:

 

Ash wood

As the natural moisture level of ash wood is around 66% it does take some time to season to a moisture level of around 20%. As it is extremely common across the UK it is no surprise to learn that Ash wood is one of the more popular wood-burning stove fuels.

 

 

 

2 hours ago, BowlandStoves said:

 

???? Ash is one of the driest woods when fresh cut at around 35% Very slow to dry from there on but good logs once dry. Beech and Oak are the two that start off very wet. Oak drys slowly but beech is quite quick drying and after a year is dryer than the ash which started off with half the amount of water in it.

 

As said many many times of here it all burns when dry just a heavy one beats a light one IME

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A "no-brainer" the mahogany trimmings from our house build 20 year ago, only the worthless scraps, most of the rest are still squirrled away in the shed.

Quite frightening the heat it put up, after I ever so carefully packed out every last cubic inch of the already hot firebox, being careful to leave gaps for optimum airflow, on top of a bed of embers.

The flue glowed dull, going on bright, cherry red.

I did not repeat my salutary experience.

Edited by difflock
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29 minutes ago, Woodworks said:

 

???? Ash is one of the driest woods when fresh cut at around 35% Very slow to dry from there on but good logs once dry.

That confused me, it may be that 66% is a dry basis number, so about 40% wet basis*. Some of the details would appear not from the UK or for stoves. I know apple wood smells nice on an open fire but on a stove it shouldn't be letting fumes into the room.

 

*https://www.forestry.gov.uk/pdf/FC-BEC-InfoSheet-Wood-as-Fuel-TechSupp-REVISED.pdf/$FILE/FC-BEC-InfoSheet-Wood-as-Fuel-TechSupp-REVISED.pdf

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I've just chucked another bit of ash on mine.... it was cut and split 3 weeks ago. The moisture content is between 20-25 according to my meter.... roaring away nicely.

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