Jump to content
Darrin Turnbull

Beginners Chainsaw Course

Recommended Posts

Been working for a landscape company , two of their workers have just completed a chainsaw course . I think upto 30 cm 12 ins diameter felling.

They were telling me about leaving a hold at the back and were told to use it as much as possible 

 The reason was , they decide when it should fall not the tree.

 

what do you guys think 🤔 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

absolute nonsense.  If anything its increasing the chance of an accident.  We all know a kickback is more likely to occur doing a bore cut then simply coming in from the back.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Maybe they are teaching this on the assumption that the student doesn't have the brains to decide when its necessary, so just do it all the time.  Who knows what they are thinking

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, Steve Bullman said:

they'll be wearing pink chainsaw trousers next.  Oh wait, thats already a thing

It could just be that they have not explained what they mean properly.

In the felling up to 380mm they train a dogs tooth cut for heavy forward weighted trees, where the back hold is severed last, or a danish cut which can be used for a tree that is not excessively leaning forward/back/side, where a hold is left at the back and severed last, with or without the use of s felling lever.

 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^^ That's exactly what we were taught (November last year). They are just cuts that you can use if it looks like the tree needed it, definitely not that they should be used as much as possible. It was tricky trying to squeeze a Danish into some of the smaller trees we were given anyway.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think the guys who told you,didn't understand what they were being taught.

Bore cut to relieve tension and reduce barbers chair on leaning tree,
Dog cut to release.

Can also be used in forestry to avoid a slow fall getting hung up.

Don't try this on a vertical tree without wedges.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, Steve Bullman said:

Maybe they are teaching this on the assumption that the student doesn't have the brains to decide when its necessary, so just do it all the time.  Who knows what they are thinking

.....Problys shouldn't be doing a chainsaw course then - hazard perception is a prerequisite k

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, peds said:

^^ That's exactly what we were taught (November last year). They are just cuts that you can use if it looks like the tree needed it, definitely not that they should be used as much as possible. It was tricky trying to squeeze a Danish into some of the smaller trees we were given anyway.

Yeh I agree, although danish cut was my favourite, aka danish default, danish pie.

its a cut that takes the most time.

 

 

16 hours ago, Steve Bullman said:

absolute nonsense.  If anything its increasing the chance of an accident.  We all know a kickback is more likely to occur doing a bore cut then simply coming in from the back.

 bore cutting Is  dangerous, yes.  But that’s if you not experienced or not expecting it and in the wrong place (work positioning) . And the worst is all 3 put together.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Featured Adverts

About

Arbtalk.co.uk is a hub for the arboriculture industry in the UK.  
If you're just starting out and you need business, equipment, tech or training support you're in the right place.  If you've done it, made it, got a van load of oily t-shirts and have decided to give something back by sharing your knowledge or wisdom,  then you're welcome too.
If you would like to contribute to making this industry more effective and safe then welcome.
Just like a living tree, it'll always be a work in progress.
Please have a look around, sign up, share and contribute the best you have.

See you inside.

The Arbtalk Team

Follow us

×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.