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jimmy45d

Use of a chainsaw without any CS certification

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Hi all,

 

Assuming I have the necessary public liability insurance and appropriate PPE, without any formal CS certification, am I legally able to use a chainsaw on a self-employed basis to take care of some local residents property along with my normal gardening duties?

 

No climbing, just low level tidying up of fallen limbs and small trees. I would consider myself safe and proficient with experience gained from private use, and would not take on anything 'risky', other than of course the general risk of operating a chainsaw.

 

Any feedback would be welcome.

 

Many thanks,

Jim

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CS is not a legal requirement .  

Hey Stubby, so for example, i was offered a large ash tree to cut up off a farmer friend of mine a while ago, but the tree had come down on a heavily used public footpath / bridleway that went through his land. I thought about it but did shy away from the job because i had no certs, no insurance etc and back then didnt really have any proper good chainsaw pants etc either
So would i have been ok to do it in the eyes of the law?

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7 minutes ago, Ratman said:


Hey Stubby, so for example, i was offered a large ash tree to cut up off a farmer friend of mine a while ago, but the tree had come down on a heavily used public footpath / bridleway that went through his land. I thought about it but did shy away from the job because i had no certs, no insurance etc and back then didnt really have any proper good chainsaw pants etc either emoji6.pngemoji39.png
So would i have been ok to do it in the eyes of the law?

You’d have been OVER qualified in Cornwall!

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15 minutes ago, Ratman said:

So would i have been ok to do it in the eyes of the law?

In essence 'yes' BUT in event of something going wrong, which I would suggest to be highly likely without any appropriate training being undertaken, you would doubtless find yourself in a very difficult position...more particularly without insurance working on land to which the public have a legitimate right to access.

Further, if you haven't followed the requirements / recommendations set out in the PUWER ACOP, e.g. certificate of competence or nationally recognized qualification in chainsaw use, you would be expected to explain / demonstrate what alternative means of achieving competence you have employed / undertaken.

Bottom line, not least because of the high level of risk to yourself...and more particularly as it sounds like the tree was wind blown perhaps (hence tension n compression wood is often unexpected / not anticipated), leave it to the experienced, insured, qualified and competent professionals...any takers? 9_9

 

Paul    

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Paul, I'm sure that every farmer I've ever met has taken everything that you've just said into consideration, before hitching up his jeans, pulling his wellies on and picking up his 'Farm Boss' to cut up a fallen tree.

 

 

Where's the tongue firmly in cheek emoji? :D

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Hey Paul, been around saws for years and would say i’m pretty competent but not a pro by any stretch. I have cut quite a lot of trees up for people previously but not been in the predicament where the public would come in to such close proximity. Was pretty sure i’d made the right call on this one, but i guess others would of carried on regardless. I do enjoy it tho

 

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In essence 'yes' BUT in event of something going wrong, which I would suggest to be highly likely without any appropriate training being undertaken, you would doubtless find yourself in a very difficult position...more particularly without insurance working on land to which the public have a legitimate right to access.
Further, if you haven't followed the requirements / recommendations set out in the PUWER ACOP, e.g. certificate of competence or nationally recognized qualification in chainsaw use, you would be expected to explain / demonstrate what alternative means of achieving competence you have employed / undertaken.
Bottom line, not least because of the high level of risk to yourself...and more particularly as it sounds like the tree was wind blown perhaps (hence tension n compression wood is often unexpected / not anticipated), leave it to the experienced, insured, qualified and competent professionals...any takers?
 
Paul    

This Jimmy.

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I’d certainly of carried on if it had blown down the opposite way and landed in the field not on the track

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7 minutes ago, Gary Prentice said:

Paul, I'm sure that every farmer I've ever met has taken everything that you've just said into consideration, before hitching up his jeans, pulling his wellies on and picking up his 'Farm Boss' to cut up a fallen tree.

 

 

Where's the tongue firmly in cheek emoji? :D

Yeah, but Ratman is a Farmer's Friend and not the farmer himself, who may be exempted when working on his own land under Grand-father rights (pre-1998 I think) in effect.

 

Tongue withdrawn...from cheek! :D

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