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Jotul - You should only burn hardwoods

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7 minutes ago, trigger_andy said:

 

Out of a 190 page book 2  pages hardly constitutes lots and lots on spot-on info does it? Considering those two pages do not even mention seasoning softwood. :D 

 

Ive mentioned Page 60 covers Kindling and ''Kitchen Wood'' I hardly think this is what Mark is referring to? In fact as the same paragraph mentions Birch as ''Living-Room Wood'' Id say it was the exact opposite. 

 

Yes, I missed that. ''Smaller Pines make good Firewood'' Take of that extract what you will. Page 60 also states, as Ive already mentioned that burning Pine will require more regular cleaning of the Stove, Chimney and Pipe System if buring a lot of Pine, not due to seasoning but the oil content. 

 

 

It was the exception rather than the rule. It was a passing comment rather than a discussion. It mentions older Soft Woods grown on poor soil. 

I dont agree, can you point me where it states that? Page 61 specifically states burning a lot of Pine will require regular cleaning due to the oil and nothing to do with seasoning, which, if someone is reading the book would realize that should be done as a matter of course. 

 

Of course you could argue that burning any kind of wood would require regular cleaning/sweeping. But its not mentioned for any other wood in the book so the obvious conclusion is burning Pine would require a much more regular interval of cleaning.  

Andy - I was really just pointing out that your comment ' I’ve been through the book extensively, there is simply nothing there promoting the burning or drying of softwood' doesn't wash.  There are many references to the drying of wood in general and to the burning of softwood in particular.  Pine, of course, is just one example of softwood - Mytting also covers spruce.

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1 minute ago, Puffingbilly413 said:

Andy - I was really just pointing out that your comment ' I’ve been through the book extensively, there is simply nothing there promoting the burning or drying of softwood' doesn't wash.  There are many references to the drying of wood in general and to the burning of softwood in particular.  Pine, of course, is just one example of softwood - Mytting also covers spruce.

There is nothing, let alone lots and lots on drying softwood is there? You mentioned pages 60 and 61. It does not really remote the burning of softwood does it? Its hardly lots and lots of Spot-on info on burning soft wood. Kindling and Kitchen Wood and if you want more light hardly constitutes promoting does it? Then the two pages goes on to say that you'll have to sweep everything out that much more regularly. 

 

You may thing that does not wash but I sure think it does. 

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1 minute ago, trigger_andy said:

There is nothing, let alone lots and lots on drying softwood is there? You mentioned pages 60 and 61. It does not really remote the burning of softwood does it? Its hardly lots and lots of Spot-on info on burning soft wood. Kindling and Kitchen Wood and if you want more light hardly constitutes promoting does it? Then the two pages goes on to say that you'll have to sweep everything out that much more regularly. 

 

You may thing that does not wash but I sure think it does. 

True - drying mostly just covers 'wood' as there is no difference in the process is there.  Pine and spruce drying is referred to, albeit briefly, on p47.

 

He also mentions combining softwoods with hardwoods in the fire to help prolong burn times on p48.  People's enjoyment of theg crackle of conifer woods in their stoves is covered on p49.  He even cites an example of pine being used as a main heating source on p50.

 

On p56 he states it is better 'to have a mixed stack of hardwoods and softwoods that can be used according to the outside temperature' ie softwoods can be burned more intensely without making a building overly hot.

 

You said 'nothing' whereas actually there is some info there.

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3 minutes ago, Puffingbilly413 said:

You said 'nothing' whereas actually there is some info there.

Ok, you got me there. :D I should have said very little in a book 191 pages long. But The pages you mentioned, 60 & 61 dont really giver it a glowing reference does it? Kindling and Kitchen Wood, not really a hearty endorsement is it? 

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Just now, trigger_andy said:

Ok, you got me there. :D I should have said very little in a book 191 pages long. But The pages you mentioned, 60 & 61 dont really giver it a glowing reference does it? Kindling and Kitchen Wood, not really a hearty endorsement is it? 

Aye but not all the book is about the wood - stoves, saws, stacking etc take up a huge part too.  The book loves birch (as do I, it's burning in my stove right now) but also discusses softwood as a fuel source (as kindling, 'kitchen wood' and also as a main fuel).  Indeed the dude who builds the big arty ring piles does so ordinarily out of pine or spruce, because that's what he can get (he's in Norway).

 

I suppose all I'm saying is that there is nothing wrong with burning softwood.  It works, and in certain circumstances can even be advantageous.  But you'll have to load the stove more often and split more wood.

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Whether or not a book refers to burning softwood or not, it is a much better fuel for the following reasons:

  • Grows uniformly, usually with a single stem and depending on species, on quite poor ground
  • Grows more quickly than hardwoods
  • Can almost always be mechanically harvested
  • Can almost always be put through a firewood processor
  • Dries much more quickly
  • Gives little away in burning performance and tar build up is only an issue if unseasoned wood is used or the fire is over damped. 

I don't know how high volume firewood suppliers manage with hardwoods. It's rare to get really good processor grade hardwood whilst softwood is a complete doddle to process.

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3 minutes ago, Big J said:

Whether or not a book refers to burning softwood or not, it is a much better fuel for the following reasons:

  • Grows uniformly, usually with a single stem and depending on species, on quite poor ground
  • Grows more quickly than hardwoods
  • Can almost always be mechanically harvested
  • Can almost always be put through a firewood processor
  • Dries much more quickly
  • Gives little away in burning performance and tar build up is only an issue if unseasoned wood is used or the fire is over damped. 

I don't know how high volume firewood suppliers manage with hardwoods. It's rare to get really good processor grade hardwood whilst softwood is a complete doddle to process.

I hate processing hardwood, unless its Birch. 

 

Softwood is great to process too, but I dont have a Kitchen Fire so have little use for it other than Kindling. :D 

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30 minutes ago, trigger_andy said:

And clean your Flue more often. ;) 

No you don't if you burn dry wood in a good stove with a sensible amount of air...

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