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westphalian

Chain snaps

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What would you recommend to prevent my chain snapping?

I mill on a Logosol M8, softwoods only. MS661 with this bar I bought from your good selvesIMG_1966.jpg

Using these Lo Pro’s from yourselves

IMG_1967.jpg

Sharpening with thisIMG_1969.jpg

After a couple of snapped chains I switched from 10% tilt to 0% but a total of 5 snapped chains in as many months (I repair them myself , the cutter having snapped)

Different bar or different chain??

Thanks

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What would you recommend to prevent my chain snapping?
I mill on a Logosol M8, softwoods only. MS661 with this bar I bought from your good selvesIMG_1966.jpg.6107c51546023777e07418cf7755fc46.jpg
Using these Lo Pro’s from yourselves
IMG_1967.thumb.jpg.8099208fc4f386ca2fcf51242c2e82f9.jpg
Sharpening with thisIMG_1969.thumb.jpg.6995de0a2e6a6536624369c6c5312fff.jpg
After a couple of snapped chains I switched from 10% tilt to 0% but a total of 5 snapped chains in as many months (I repair them myself , the cutter having snapped)
Different bar or different chain??
Thanks


I’d just put it down to a Rough operator 🤣
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Concerned about being shouted shouted down as yet to do any milling...

Merely being an engineer and cutter.

Surely a tilt down to zero % must add more pressure onto a chain than giving the cutting edge a leading in point?

Am I being thick here, or doesn’t a lead in with more of an angle to the cutting edge equal less pressure onto the chain rather than the entire cutting edge hitting the work simultaneously, rather than the point being the initial insert into the work? Although the picture of your chain shows the rakers as being untouched, I can only ask whether taking down the rakers too much on another chain along with too flat an angle on the cutting teeth has contributed to the breaks?

 

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What's tilt? Do you mean camber?
0 degrees top plate angle gives a very smooth finish.
I run standard 404 and 3/8 and Never had a chain snap.

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Stihl recommends 10deg/ camber tilt whatever on the Lo Pro so I have always done this but after two snapping read on the web that a lot of people always file horizontal so I tried that. I spoke to chainsawbars a few months ago and he said it's just a matter of opinion whether it's horizontal or 10.

initially I figured it was just the strain of 3 hours solid milling, never having had a chain snap doing general work in 20 odd years. now, I MUST be doing something wrong or I have a wrong combo??

better add I rotate bar, clean it, file it etc so it is def approp maintained. also , I do think a fairly new chain has snapped. if I had to guess I would blame the bar as I never had the problem with my prev Oregon.

mind, I know feck all (only 2 years milling and still learning) so am open to any suggestions

Edited by westphalian

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Something is going on if you are snapping the chain regularly - I don't think it would be the angle of sharpening.

 

Good to see you using a guide. It's hard to diagnose the reasons but will try and highlight them in order of mist likely causes:

 

  • Something is going on with the bar - this is the most likely cause of chain snapping I've had. I see you dress rotate and clean out the bar so not sure if this is the reason in this case.
  • Using a big saw on a small bar - using the MS661 with a 20" bar is definately going to mean there only needs a small margin of error for a chain to snap.
  • Too big a 'hook' in the tooth - or depth gauges too low - the teeth look good on the chain you have there - but if you are putting too big a hook or reducing the depth gauges too low this will put much more strain on the chain - this could well be the reason in this case especially as you said it is breaking on the tooth itself.
  • Too little oil - that chain looks pretty dry and dusty - I am assuming the oiler is turned up full. Usually [but not always!] if everything is cutting well the chain stays pretty clean
  • Damaged drive rim or sprocket - this damages the drive links which in turn damage the bar.

 

So hope that gives you something to go on. If you need to PM me and we can sort a deal on a new bar, drive rim and chain combo so at least then you can rule out the bar as the issue.

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What sprocket are you using? Gustharts sold a lad i mill for the wrong 3/8 sprocket for lo pro on 660, which caused premature chain wear

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3 hours ago, Rob D said:

Something is going on if you are snapping the chain regularly - I don't think it would be the angle of sharpening.

 

Good to see you using a guide. It's hard to diagnose the reasons but will try and highlight them in order of mist likely causes:

 

  • Something is going on with the bar - this is the most likely cause of chain snapping I've had. I see you dress rotate and clean out the bar so not sure if this is the reason in this case.
  • Using a big saw on a small bar - using the MS661 with a 20" bar is definately going to mean there only needs a small margin of error for a chain to snap.
  • Too big a 'hook' in the tooth - or depth gauges too low - the teeth look good on the chain you have there - but if you are putting too big a hook or reducing the depth gauges too low this will put much more strain on the chain - this could well be the reason in this case especially as you said it is breaking on the tooth itself.
  • Too little oil - that chain looks pretty dry and dusty - I am assuming the oiler is turned up full. Usually [but not always!] if everything is cutting well the chain stays pretty clean
  • Damaged drive rim or sprocket - this damages the drive links which in turn damage the bar.

 

So hope that gives you something to go on. If you need to PM me and we can sort a deal on a new bar, drive rim and chain combo so at least then you can rule out the bar as the issue.

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ok, I could buy a bigger bar but I have half a dozen chains, I would have to remove the bar guide from the mill jig and I can only lift max of 20" stems onto the mill.

so far not had to file down the depth gauges

looks dusty as had just been going thru some thick scots pine bark but I will check.

I will take a pic of the sprocket and post

 

cheers

 

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2 hours ago, topchippyles said:

1st what timber are you cutting,Sounds like you are forcing the saw which would put pressure on the chains.

mostly N spruce and larch

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