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wisewood

Trailers help

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I had a conversation about this with the guy who sold me my trailer, which is rated to 2700kg but car max 1800kg towing. He said they used to offer new plates with reduced weight stamped on for people who wanted to tow them with cars but they don't do any more after the rules changed.
BUT he didn't want me to take that as legal advice and in any case I tow it with a Landrover now anyway.

Nearest to a proper answer from
https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/towing-a-trailer-with-a-car-or-van/towing-a-trailer-with-a-car-or-van-the-basics


Where the sum of the maximum plated weights of the towing vehicle and of the trailer added together exceed the plated GCW of the towing vehicle, this is not a problem as long as the ‘actual’ weights of the vehicle and trailer (which may not be fully laden at the time) do not exceed the plated GCW.

So it's down to the weighbridge....

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I was "told" recently, our local plod will look at the "potential" max load.
So even an empty 2ton trailer is needing a +E.
However both my driving instructors of 30 years experience promised I would not be legal to tow any trailer on a B licence.
Well that's bollox.
☹️

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The plated weight of the trailer does not need to be within the capacity of the car as long as the real weight is.

 

That's a C& U reg.

 

 

Re cat B licences it is done on max potential weights.

Edited by Justme
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Taken from a site off google, should help ya and is pretty clear for ya you just need to be careful when combining your weights thats main thing, but this is all dependant on what age you are and what licence you hold. But the plated weight must not be exceeded in any case.

 

Towing - the legal bits

 

Whether you’re planning a caravanning holiday or moving house, you need to make sure you comply with the law on towing.

 

Restrictions differ on when your driving licence was issued.

 

Licences issued from 1 January 1997

 

If you passed your car driving test on or after 1 January 1997 you can:

 

Drive a car or van up to 3,500kg maximum authorised mass (MAM) towing a trailer of up to 750kg MAM

Tow a trailer over 750kg MAM as long as the combined MAM of the trailer and towing vehicle is no more than 3,500kg

MAM is the limit on how much the vehicle can weigh when it’s loaded.

 

You have to pass the car and trailer driving test if you want to tow anything heavier - this is called a B+E test. You might need several lessons before you’re ready to take the test.

 

Licences issued before 1 January 1997

 

If you passed your car test before 1 January 1997 you’re usually allowed to drive a vehicle and trailer combination up to 8,250kg MAM.

You’re also allowed to drive a minibus with a trailer over 750kg MAM.

 

And a little extra to add in also......

 

What does towing capacity mean?

 

Most cars have a maximum weight that they can tow safely and legally.

 

The first thing to do is make sure that what you wish to tow doesn’t exceed the trailer's own maximum authorised mass or the car's maximum towing capacity; both figures should be easy to find in the drivers manual.

 

 

There are usually two maximum towing weights that will be specified: a braked trailer weight and an unbraked one. It’s important to note that if the trailer weight is more than 750kg or over half the car’s kerb weight (this is the weight of the car without people or luggage inside and should be listed in the manual), the trailer must be fitted with brakes.

 

The second important thing to point out is the maximum capacity will also include the weight of the trailer/caravan/horsebox itself, so you’ll need to add that into the equation when thinking about how much weight you can transport.

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1 hour ago, Ratman said:

Taken from a site off google, should help ya and is pretty clear for ya emoji106.png you just need to be careful when combining your weights thats main thing, but this is all dependant on what age you are and what licence you hold. But the plated weight must not be exceeded in any case.

 

Towing - the legal bits

 

Whether you’re planning a caravanning holiday or moving house, you need to make sure you comply with the law on towing.

 

Restrictions differ on when your driving licence was issued.

 

Licences issued from 1 January 1997

 

If you passed your car driving test on or after 1 January 1997 you can:

 

Drive a car or van up to 3,500kg maximum authorised mass (MAM) towing a trailer of up to 750kg MAM

Tow a trailer over 750kg MAM as long as the combined MAM of the trailer and towing vehicle is no more than 3,500kg

MAM is the limit on how much the vehicle can weigh when it’s loaded.

 

You have to pass the car and trailer driving test if you want to tow anything heavier - this is called a B+E test. You might need several lessons before you’re ready to take the test.

 

Licences issued before 1 January 1997

 

If you passed your car test before 1 January 1997 you’re usually allowed to drive a vehicle and trailer combination up to 8,250kg MAM.

You’re also allowed to drive a minibus with a trailer over 750kg MAM.

 

And a little extra to add in also......

 

What does towing capacity mean?

 

Most cars have a maximum weight that they can tow safely and legally.

 

The first thing to do is make sure that what you wish to tow doesn’t exceed the trailer's own maximum authorised mass or the car's maximum towing capacity; both figures should be easy to find in the drivers manual.

 

 

There are usually two maximum towing weights that will be specified: a braked trailer weight and an unbraked one. It’s important to note that if the trailer weight is more than 750kg or over half the car’s kerb weight (this is the weight of the car without people or luggage inside and should be listed in the manual), the trailer must be fitted with brakes.

 

The second important thing to point out is the maximum capacity will also include the weight of the trailer/caravan/horsebox itself, so you’ll need to add that into the equation when thinking about how much weight you can transport.

That’s precisely what I’ve been looking for! Thanks ratman. I don’t suppose you know the law in regards to older homemade trailers with no plates on them?  Thanks ant 

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