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Fastest splitter costing over £ 1500

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If your getting something made I would make sure the blade is big ie deep. You dont often see it mentioned but the large blade increases productivity no end. You put a 12" ring on the table and with a 12" blade two cuts one side turn 90degrees make two more passes and you have nine logs. You see nice videos of dinky blades on the side of a big ring and they fall in half but dont find we get much wood which is that submissive. 

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The only problem with a bigger blade is you lose power (or need a bigger ram to push it) as there is more surface area.

 

And then the problem with a bigger ram is you lose speed (or need a bigger pump/engine to power it)

 

And then the problem with a bigger engine is it costs more to buy, run, and isn't as compact.

 

Swings and roundabouts! :bike:

 

Or course if the machine is only ever going to be used in a nice big level yard then being compact isn't an issue

 

 

Oh and I've always wondered if a good splitter could be made using a scrap diesel car. An old Peugeot engine with no computers would be good?

Edited by scbk

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16 minutes ago, Woodworks said:

If your getting something made I would make sure the blade is big ie deep. You dont often see it mentioned but the large blade increases productivity no end. You put a 12" ring on the table and with a 12" blade two cuts one side turn 90degrees make two more passes and you have nine logs. You see nice videos of dinky blades on the side of a big ring and they fall in half but dont find we get much wood which is that submissive. 

100% agree - Already done that previously - Boron steel, no quite at Hardox spec. but good for the price.

Grid up the rings every time.

Anything up to 360mm goes through the processor and really large rings get halved then grid cut.

Planning to buy the Krpan or Rytek and just fit longer splitting knife and our own higher spec. pto pump.

Just disconnect Processor PTO shaft if we only wish to use Splitter alone.

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19 minutes ago, scbk said:

The only problem with a bigger blade is you lose power (or need a bigger ram to push it) as there is more surface area.

 

And then the problem with a bigger ram is you lose speed (or need a bigger pump/engine to power it)

 

And then the problem with a bigger engine is it costs more to buy, run, and isn't as compact.

 

Swings and roundabouts! :bike:

 

Or course if the machine is only ever going to be used in a nice big level yard then being compact isn't an issue

 

 

Oh and I've always wondered if a good splitter could be made using a scrap diesel car. An old Peugeot engine with no computers would be good?

Running a larger pump is not an issue from a tractor.

 

I have seen processors, chippers etc. run off old engines but if you factor in the labour content I decided it's far better to have the correct tools for the task and focus on producing the product.

 

As most established suppliers know, it's all about having the stock on the shelf. I would never ever ever wish to say we have not got a product we promote in stock.

 

The only people I turn away are long distance requests - we used to supply those but not anymore, fuel and labour are just too expensive.

 

 

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6 hours ago, arboriculturist said:

and additional flow control valve, which allows you to regulate oil flow rate to the splitter regardless of engine revs.

You should be aware that most flow control valves dump the excess flow across the same pressure as the active service so they tend to heat up the oil much as passing the full flow to a service. It's no big deal until the flows get higher.

 

We had this problem with the County crane becoming too difficult to control when the PTO ran a chipper if the pump was big enough to load with during normal use.

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5 hours ago, scbk said:

Oh and I've always wondered if a good splitter could be made using a scrap diesel car. An old Peugeot engine with no computers would be good?

I held on to a pug XD2 which I had had rebuilt just before the 504 pick up was written off 20 years ago just for this purpose. I finally decided I wanted the space and put it on ebay yesterday. I wore a hole in the sump which must have got rusty, dragging it across the floor for photos and it dumped its oil on the floor.

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Can recommend the posch 9t -10t splitters for a small tractor , does all our oversized wood ours is 20 years old and still keeps going, I would not like to guess how many tons it split! IMG_1532275927.914396.jpg

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57 minutes ago, openspaceman said:

You should be aware that most flow control valves dump the excess flow across the same pressure as the active service so they tend to heat up the oil much as passing the full flow to a service. It's no big deal until the flows get higher.

 

We had this problem with the County crane becoming too difficult to control when the PTO ran a chipper if the pump was big enough to load with during normal use.

Agreed - that's why I am letting Interfluid at Gunnislake crunch the numbers for me.

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I use a Posch 20 ton vertical splitter to create billets from 900mm long rounds,  powered my a MF135,  so 45hp when new.   These are then stacked for a year before going through a small processor.    The stroke of the machine can be restricted, the return height is what is adjustable,  you can then get a raised base as an option to put the ring on.   Cutting rings that are to big for my processor then I stack three or four rings up and power through the top 3 with a 4 way head,  that gives me 6 usable logs from the back of the split,  slide the pile further in and chop another 6,  then tidy up the remainder.  The bottom ring I try to leave in place as the stroke ends just short of the base so part of that ring may still be hanging on if its a stringy timber.

 

Big volume then the Fuelwood Splitta is a real good tool,  so good that Posch have now copied it by the looks of things.  Fully auto as well.

 

 

A

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11 hours ago, Alycidon said:

I use a Posch 20 ton vertical splitter to create billets from 900mm long rounds,  powered my a MF135,  so 45hp when new.   These are then stacked for a year before going through a small processor.    The stroke of the machine can be restricted, the return height is what is adjustable,  you can then get a raised base as an option to put the ring on.   Cutting rings that are to big for my processor then I stack three or four rings up and power through the top 3 with a 4 way head,  that gives me 6 usable logs from the back of the split,  slide the pile further in and chop another 6,  then tidy up the remainder.  The bottom ring I try to leave in place as the stroke ends just short of the base so part of that ring may still be hanging on if its a stringy timber.

 

Big volume then the Fuelwood Splitta is a real good tool,  so good that Posch have now copied it by the looks of things.  Fully auto as well.

 

 

A

Is that the   -   Posch 35T SplitMaster Log Splitter  ? Thanks

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