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Trees and drought

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Probably a bit extreme to call it a drought but here in NI there has been no rainfall for over 2 months. Hosepipe ban has been in place for a couple of weeks now. I've noticed a big beech near me that looks like it is in Autumn. Noticing a lot of other trees of all types and sizes have browning leaves, or sections that look completely gone, even some evergreen trees. Noticing more dead trees too but this may be a coincidence rather than a cause. How long does no rainfall have a long term effect on trees? Will they recover when the rain returns? From a climbing point of view, are these trees now weaker as a result? Any other advice welcome.

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I would have thought the more mature trees (with bigger root systems) would mainly be OK in the longer term, when rain returns. (Unless they have other weaknesses / illnesses perhaps).

 

Newly planted trees may die.

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Newly planted trees are dying. What a waste to plant, and then not water or even mulch them.

 

 

Annoyingly, there still seems plenty of resources for planters an hanging baskets - things with no long term environmental benefits.

Edited by Gary Prentice
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3 hours ago, sandspider said:

I would have thought the more mature trees (with bigger root systems) would mainly be OK in the longer term, when rain returns. (Unless they have other weaknesses / illnesses perhaps).

 

Newly planted trees may die.

The exceptionally wet winter is very likely to have compromised the deep roots. They may well still serve as an anchor but unlikely to be fit enough for water supply to the tree. The trees have to rely on shallow roots for that and around here the shallow soil is literally bone dry.

I've seen a lot of silver birch seriously struggling, some of my mature apple trees are looking desperate and a mature oak that was seemingly healthy has snapped off its roots. Noticed another oak shedding small branches too (like they do in early summer to combat caterpillars) which must be a sign of stress.

 

Kept my newly planted apples alive with an IBC and hosepipe, I think the fact they had been pot grown has helped with them.

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23 minutes ago, Peasgood said:

The exceptionally wet winter is very likely to have compromised the deep roots. They may well still serve as an anchor but unlikely to be fit enough for water supply to the tree. The trees have to rely on shallow roots for that and around here the shallow soil is literally bone dry.

I've seen a lot of silver birch seriously struggling, some of my mature apple trees are looking desperate and a mature oak that was seemingly healthy has snapped off its roots. Noticed another oak shedding small branches too (like they do in early summer to combat caterpillars) which must be a sign of stress.

 

Kept my newly planted apples alive with an IBC and hosepipe, I think the fact they had been pot grown has helped with them.

Yes I have seen quite a few Birch and Willow suffering as well ...

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22 minutes ago, Peasgood said:

The exceptionally wet winter is very likely to have compromised the deep roots. They may well still serve as an anchor but unlikely to be fit enough for water supply to the tree. The trees have to rely on shallow roots for that and around here the shallow soil is literally bone dry.

I've seen a lot of silver birch seriously struggling, some of my mature apple trees are looking desperate and a mature oak that was seemingly healthy has snapped off its roots. Noticed another oak shedding small branches too (like they do in early summer to combat caterpillars) which must be a sign of stress.

 

Kept my newly planted apples alive with an IBC and hosepipe, I think the fact they had been pot grown has helped with them.

Down in Wales I'm not sure we had that wet a spring. Certainly not lasting standing water or anything I'd expect to damage the roots, but I stand to be corrected on that. Shallow soil is very dry around me, but I've not (touch wood) seen signs of any trees (mature or recently planted) struggling. I have watered my orchard once or twice to be safe. Hopefully a thunderstorm happening at home now!

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IMG_1233.thumb.JPG.9c3c33694037402590a1edce03f2145d.JPGIMG_1234.thumb.JPG.6d9f8e0ccb786df870e91cb23740c6cb.JPGHere's a few pics of a central reservation in Nottingham this are was planted 3 years ago a lot of the trees failed and have now been re planted they are on there way out. This must have cost thousand to plant remove replant and now remove again probably in a years time . Why not just set a team on watering instead of cutting grass that doesn't need cutting . 

IMG_1232.JPG

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5 hours ago, sandspider said:

Down in Wales I'm not sure we had that wet a spring. Certainly not lasting standing water or anything I'd expect to damage the roots, but I stand to be corrected on that. Shallow soil is very dry around me, but I've not (touch wood) seen signs of any trees (mature or recently planted) struggling. I have watered my orchard once or twice to be safe. Hopefully a thunderstorm happening at home now!

These conditions are usually fairly localised. People from all around the country were telling me how wet the winter/spring was but if your bit wasn't it is no surprise.

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4 hours ago, Tom Richards said:

IMG_1233.thumb.JPG.9c3c33694037402590a1edce03f2145d.JPGIMG_1234.thumb.JPG.6d9f8e0ccb786df870e91cb23740c6cb.JPGHere's a few pics of a central reservation in Nottingham this are was planted 3 years ago a lot of the trees failed and have now been re planted they are on there way out. This must have cost thousand to plant remove replant and now remove again probably in a years time . Why not just set a team on watering instead of cutting grass that doesn't need cutting . 

IMG_1232.JPG

A three year (since planting) extra heavyselected Standard won't have developed that much of a root system to begin to become draught tolerant

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Definately seeing it down here - established mature broadleafs are toasted on the tops , S.Birch actually failing ! New tree plantings with no mulch ( In my view THE MOST important planting operation -Glendales I am looking at you ...) We are on clay here - so thankgod for last nights heavy shower . Soil moisture wont balance out til  end of year . K

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