Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
briquette_seller

How much wood do I have??

Recommended Posts

In the early days I always assumed someone had been helping themselves to my firewood, but I now know the reason. I find the shrinkage is very noticeable in this weather especially in a large pile of wood.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We ran a few bags off yesterday and were surprised when we stacked them next to the bags that were done 4 weeks ago, now some of the heights difference may be due to the bags relaxing in this heat but the logs are also now very dry sub 20%, all the bags were shaken and topped up same as the previous ones ! we would think 10% shrinkage IMG_3261.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We've got about 100 cube at the yard, all tinder dry now with the heat we've had. Nothing over about 16% MC

 

I've got a shipping container ready to load on the artic going to Devon with 22 cube of chunky firewood for our new house. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The losses incurred through chainsaw rather than bandsaw must far outweigh any notional losses through shrinkage I’d have thought? 

 

I cut with chainsaw and end up with masses of sawdust - that’s all lost firewood. 

 

Im guessing (on a larger scale) the productivity v lost volume v bi product disposal v cost of machinery etc etc would be considerations if firewood is a significant part (or all) of the main business effort. 

 

Where does the break even point sit for the expense of firewood processing machinery as opposed to hand cutting? I’m guessing there are elements of time / convenience to consider also. I’ve often looked at the band and table saws and can’t quite justify the expense as it stands. That said, I’m only cutting for home use, be different if I was selling. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Non of the chainsaw dust from my jobs goes to waste. I use one of these to reform it into brickettes. It often triples the job time, but I am totally ripped.

Thinking of getting one on a splitting ram so I can compress them more and save space. SI15899-40.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, kevinjohnsonmbe said:

The losses incurred through chainsaw rather than bandsaw must far outweigh any notional losses through shrinkage I’d have thought? 

 

I cut with chainsaw and end up with masses of sawdust - that’s all lost firewood. 

 

Im guessing (on a larger scale) the productivity v lost volume v bi product disposal v cost of machinery etc etc would be considerations if firewood is a significant part (or all) of the main business effort. 

 

Where does the break even point sit for the expense of firewood processing machinery as opposed to hand cutting? I’m guessing there are elements of time / convenience to consider also. I’ve often looked at the band and table saws and can’t quite justify the expense as it stands. That said, I’m only cutting for home use, be different if I was selling. 

It may be lost firewood but the sawdust and processor debris/screenings still have a value.

 

One man's waste is anothers treasure.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, billpierce said:

Non of the chainsaw dust from my jobs goes to waste. I use one of these to reform it into brickettes. It often triples the job time, but I am totally ripped.

Thinking of getting one on a splitting ram so I can compress them more and save space. SI15899-40.jpeg

I thought I was frugal, but that's too much effort even for me 😆

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, kevinjohnsonmbe said:

The losses incurred through chainsaw rather than bandsaw must far outweigh any notional losses through shrinkage I’d have thought? 

I doubt it

4 hours ago, kevinjohnsonmbe said:

 

I cut with chainsaw and end up with masses of sawdust - that’s all lost firewood. 

but probably only around 2% of the log is lost as sawdust, far more lost in splitniks and bark falling off

4 hours ago, kevinjohnsonmbe said:

Where does the break even point sit for the expense of firewood processing machinery as opposed to hand cutting? I’m guessing there are elements of time / convenience to consider also. I’ve often looked at the band and table saws and can’t quite justify the expense as it stands. That said, I’m only cutting for home use, be different if I was selling. 

As I see it the major savings are in cutting rehandling and loading compared with a chainsaw and axe, plus the machine doesn't get tired.

1 hour ago, briquette_seller said:

It may be lost firewood but the sawdust and processor debris/screenings still have a value.

 

Handy for heating the drying floor if stocks get low in the winter

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Featured Adverts

About

Arbtalk.co.uk is a hub for the arboriculture industry in the UK.  
If you're just starting out and you need business, equipment, tech or training support you're in the right place.  If you've done it, made it, got a van load of oily t-shirts and have decided to give something back by sharing your knowledge or wisdom,  then you're welcome too.
If you would like to contribute to making this industry more effective and safe then welcome.
Just like a living tree, it'll always be a work in progress.
Please have a look around, sign up, share and contribute the best you have.

See you inside.

The Arbtalk Team

Follow us

×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.