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Selling poplar as firewood

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I bonfired 250 ton of the stuff, found it awful as firewood, only way I could get it to burn was mixed with some spruce. Stick it on the sawmill or chip it.

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14 hours ago, Big J said:
 
So take advantage of this summer folks. It's like a kiln for your timber

Can't believe how well the woods drying this year. Reckon I'll split right into August and still be able to sell in the new year. Woods been down a good while anyway.

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9 hours ago, nepia said:

Hmm - I think you'd find pop pretty far down the list for longevity of burn.  Oak, ash, euc, robinia, beech, syc make up nearly all my hardwood and would be well ahead of pop in those stakes.

But there's no right or wrong, just preference.

I think a better fuel-in-the-car comparison would be unleaded vs meths!

Agreed, but i was just curious of the real time difference in the burn times. So if oak burns for 45 minutes, does pop burn for 35.....  Meaning over the course of a 3 hour evening burn the difference is one extra refil for example. No big deal in reality. I think too much emphasis is put on the poshness of hardwoods!

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if you took oak and pop pieces of equal size and moisture and the oak lasted 45 minutes I'd give the pop 10!

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Pop is the " go to " fire wood . You are always going to get another bit :001_smile:

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19 hours ago, Big J said:

 

So take advantage of this summer folks. It's like a kiln for your timber!

Very true, before winter I intend to invest in a load of tarps and sheet up as much of the timber I can in my yard. I really don't want to loose all the gains this weather is creating! 

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I agree it burns fine but the thing is dry poplar logs are noticeably light weight compared to dry ash or oak, so if you work on the premise that the amount of heat is proportional to weight then you aren't getting as much heat for your money in a cube of pop. It's not a premium product.
I sell very small quantities of firewood, I call it second grade and mix in everything elm, lime, horse chestnut etc etc. I tell people if they want premium product then go to a firewood merchant where it will be better wood and more expensive. Informed choice is ok imo, I don't think you could mix it in if you're charging top whack.

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Exactly the use that Arbtalker gensetsteve uses/used it for making on an industrial scale.  Pity we don't hear from him these days.

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2 hours ago, Dan Maynard said:

I agree it burns fine but the thing is dry poplar logs are noticeably light weight compared to dry ash or oak, so if you work on the premise that the amount of heat is proportional to weight then you aren't getting as much heat for your money in a cube of pop. It's not a premium product.
I sell very small quantities of firewood, I call it second grade and mix in everything elm, lime, horse chestnut etc etc. I tell people if they want premium product then go to a firewood merchant where it will be better wood and more expensive. Informed choice is ok imo, I don't think you could mix it in if you're charging top whack.

yep , this is true . Say one Holm Oak log = two pop logs . This dosnt make it bad .

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