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Is the government clearing the way for a stove tax?

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If Michael "Stove Ban" Gove gets his way it looks like we will be seeing more restrictions on stove use in inner cities - is the government clearing the way for yet another stealth tax?

 

Is it fair to say that when politicians talk about helping the environment it tends to lead to a new tax or tax rises?

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If Micheal Gove is looking at woodburning stove's with a view to banning them, then you can bet others are as well..

I'll give it a couple of years and then they'll bring in some law to get em banned one way or the other..

 

 

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So take it out and have an open fire again ?  Its bollox .

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They can't do it it as a purchase tax as it would encourage people to stick with old stoves which are more polluting.

That leaves an operating tax.  A flat tax per stove/house would be unenforceable without lots of resource, so pointless.  That leaves a tax on fuel.  It may be possible to tax wood sales.... Easier above a certain volume maybe....vat registered ones maybe.... But again does this work counter productively?  Would it make for more small boys, more tree surgeons doing a few cube on the side, and does this mean the less well area seasoned?  Perhaps.

 

A ban in cities seems more likely than a tax I think.

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They could do it like the old TV license vans . A license to operate a wood burner with a data base and vans driving round checking for smoke 😀  

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Maybe with ir cameras looking for heat plumes from chimneys but not smoke so easily.... Most burning is an evening thing.... It's dark when the stove is on.

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They already have adequate regulations to enforce the emissions regs that are currently in place,  but these are not policed or enforced normally.   Anyone buying a stove without having it installed by the Hetas ( or similar) reg contractor needs their details formally notifying to their local building standards officer who can then ensure that its correctly and safely installed.  Modern stoves are the solution to wood smoke pollution not the cause,   that is people burning wood in open fires and old non smoke approved stoves within cities like London that have a blanket smoke control policy.

 

A

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Alycidon, I don't get your point.  I self installed, and notified BC, but doesn't stop me using a stove with wet wood, or even from using a non approved stove.  I can install a non approved (for wood stove). Inform BC, completing the paperwork to say it is suitable for smokeless fuel (assuming it is).  Once BC are happy it's safe they don't police what I actually burn.

 

I agree though that the current rules are pretty good but not often enforced.

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On 13/07/2018 at 13:50, neiln said:

Alycidon, I don't get your point.  I self installed, and notified BC, but doesn't stop me using a stove with wet wood, or even from using a non approved stove.  I can install a non approved (for wood stove). Inform BC, completing the paperwork to say it is suitable for smokeless fuel (assuming it is).  Once BC are happy it's safe they don't police what I actually burn.

 

I agree though that the current rules are pretty good but not often enforced.

I would agree that having got your stove properly certified currently there is nothing in any legislation to prevent you burning wet wood unless you are causing a smoke issue for people living close to you,  that is an offence for which you can be prosecuted.  There are simply not enough people in local building control offices to enforce the regs currently in place.    Personally I would like to see a legal maximum moisture content on firewood sold by vendors like me but not only is that highly unlikely again it cant be enforced.

 

A

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