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philh

polyethylene glycol peg

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Hi everyone has anyone used polyethylene glycol peg for drying out and treating green wood ? If so what results have you had and do you use it neat or watered down ?

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Well Philh I guess maybe the answer then is no.  Certainly I haven't used it.  Or heard of it's use for that matter.  Will you enlighten us as to its uses?

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I read a paper on this, found by a general search. The gist being the water in the wood is replaced by PEG ,done by submerging the wood in PEG and warming gently for a long (long) time. The PEG doesn't evaporate like water so the wood is less likely to crack.

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19 minutes ago, MrNick said:

I read a paper on this, found by a general search. The gist being the water in the wood is replaced by PEG ,done by submerging the wood in PEG and warming gently for a long (long) time. The PEG doesn't evaporate like water so the wood is less likely to crack.

Yes it essentially fixes it as green wood, as the cells remain full there is no shrinkage and the wood remains as heavy as green.

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Reading between the lines it's mostly used in the states also in RV antifreeze my boss used it many years ago with good results just curious if anyone has been using it cheers for ur replys guys

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Havent used it myself but it is popular in woodturning circles. One difficulty in using it is getting a finish to adhere to it once the bowl had been turned. Don't know how widely used it is these days but when I started turning it was all the rage about 20 years ago.

 

Mike

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I've used it on Elm cross sections , didn't really get into it too much some people preferred splits in the wood .I have  got a book somewhere, doesn't come liquid, a bit like wax.   

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