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ellmal

Firewood general

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Hi again,

 

thanks for so many responses, didn't expect so many of you will answer my questions, many thanks!

 

Now I know more.

 

My question about measurements was because I started from ebay and first few and most popular auctions are in kg and for ash I saw 12ish £ per 10kg (expensive!), later on after more deeper search I found cubic metres from 100£ to 120£ but not in ebay.

 

Again with quality: how to differentiate high and low quality. Are there any certificates or something? or just trials and luck at first ?

 

My friend mentioned about firewood from eastern europe, cheaper and high quality. I've checked it briefly with him and it is really cheap, he tells me that it is also high quality (they have a lot of forests that's why). I'm asking about certificates etc. because I'm not entirely sure if I should trust him in that case cuz he is not an expert.

I can always import more at once and even sell the rest that I don't need, or keep it for next years.

 

Here is my next question: how to store it properly? I have small garage size shed near my house where I planned to store it, but I also have big warehouse where I currently store car parts and electronics(I mean it is dry place etc), I can make separate area and store wood there if I will make one big purchase. Is that good idea?

 

One more: I see kiln dried and seasoned wood, both of them can be under 20% moisture? What are the differences for customer?

 

That is all for now, I'm glad we have this small discussion. Again many thanks for responses.

 

Regards

 

 

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7 minutes ago, ellmal said:

Hi again,

 

thanks for so many responses, didn't expect so many of you will answer my questions, many thanks!

 

Now I know more.

 

My question about measurements was because I started from ebay and first few and most popular auctions are in kg and for ash I saw 12ish £ per 10kg (expensive!), later on after more deeper search I found cubic metres from 100£ to 120£ but not in ebay.

 

Again with quality: how to differentiate high and low quality. Are there any certificates or something? or just trials and luck at first ?

 

My friend mentioned about firewood from eastern europe, cheaper and high quality. I've checked it briefly with him and it is really cheap, he tells me that it is also high quality (they have a lot of forests that's why). I'm asking about certificates etc. because I'm not entirely sure if I should trust him in that case cuz he is not an expert.

I can always import more at once and even sell the rest that I don't need, or keep it for next years.

 

Here is my next question: how to store it properly? I have small garage size shed near my house where I planned to store it, but I also have big warehouse where I currently store car parts and electronics(I mean it is dry place etc), I can make separate area and store wood there if I will make one big purchase. Is that good idea?

 

One more: I see kiln dried and seasoned wood, both of them can be under 20% moisture? What are the differences for customer?

 

That is all for now, I'm glad we have this small discussion. Again many thanks for responses.

 

Regards

 

 

Storing ........Keep the rain off but , allow plenty of air flow .

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I wonder how they dispose of the crate?, I suspect some of the numpty chatteringclass  purchasers, put it out for the binmen?

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2 hours ago, ellmal said:

Hi again,

 

thanks for so many responses, didn't expect so many of you will answer my questions, many thanks!

 

Now I know more.

 

My question about measurements was because I started from ebay and first few and most popular auctions are in kg and for ash I saw 12ish £ per 10kg (expensive!), later on after more deeper search I found cubic metres from 100£ to 120£ but not in ebay.

 

Again with quality: how to differentiate high and low quality. Are there any certificates or something? or just trials and luck at first ?

 

My friend mentioned about firewood from eastern europe, cheaper and high quality. I've checked it briefly with him and it is really cheap, he tells me that it is also high quality (they have a lot of forests that's why). I'm asking about certificates etc. because I'm not entirely sure if I should trust him in that case cuz he is not an expert.

I can always import more at once and even sell the rest that I don't need, or keep it for next years.

 

Here is my next question: how to store it properly? I have small garage size shed near my house where I planned to store it, but I also have big warehouse where I currently store car parts and electronics(I mean it is dry place etc), I can make separate area and store wood there if I will make one big purchase. Is that good idea?

 

One more: I see kiln dried and seasoned wood, both of them can be under 20% moisture? What are the differences for customer?

 

That is all for now, I'm glad we have this small discussion. Again many thanks for responses.

 

Regards

 

 

I think you'll find its only cheap if you buy a container load at a time, unless I misread your post

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Prices.. I always compare price to how much heat I'd expect to a bag of coal. If coal is cheaper for the heat then I leave the wood. However you do have to pay for someone to process the wood for you, the more processed it is when you receive it, the higher the price - get it straight of the back of a van in randon species, you store and split it is the cheapest

 

Kiln dried / seasoned only makes a difference really for the seller - kiln dried and they can process more in a year in a smaller area. Seasoned and you need a large area to store the wood as it dries for a couple of years. Otherwise exactly the same.

 

Certificates will add a cost.

 

Storage - keep the rain off is key. Depends how much of your heating will be by the stove Iguess depends where you store the wood. If you have to mobe 1m3 everyu other week to your shed from warehouse then it might make more sense to store it in the shed. Mine is in the garage once dried - easy access

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As has already been mentioned, you will probably do best by building a good shed and drying it yourself.  We built ours about 6 years ago now and it has made a huge difference. We have three bays, each 8ft by 8ft on the base. We started by neatly stacking, but decided eventually it was too time consuming so we put some planks on the sides and now just chuck the wood in and leave it a year. I think most homeowners severely underestimate how much storage they will need for their firewood, if using a wood burner all winter. Then they either end up paying through the nose for kiln dried wood in the middle of winter, or burning wood with a high moisture content.

 

Regarding types of wood - we cut our own on site, mostly dealing with windblown branches, trunks, and pruning. We haven't had to bring in anything from off site in a number of years. We burn everything, regardless of type and it all burns well, so long as it has had time to dry. Although ash, oak and holly are probably our favourites as they are dense and hot burning when seasoned.

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