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Mick Dempsey

New laws on woodburners

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2 minutes ago, Squaredy said:

I looked into smokeless zones in 2008 when I installed my logburner and couldn't find any proper info online about which areas are smokeless zones.  Is there a website where you can check using a postcode?  I certainly couldn't find one when I installed my logburner so I just did it anyway.  I live in a fairly rural area so I assumed it would be fine but I wanted to check but got nowhere.

I think you need to check with your local council.

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12 hours ago, Darrin Turnbull said:

Just been watching a program on German tv about Fine Particulate.

using dry wood makes a big difference and also the lighting of the fire.

not from beneath but from the top downwards.

 I think people should know how to use the stove probably.

Yup, totally agree. I always light from top down , it's bloody obvious really, the smoke gets burnt in the kindling as the fire gets going. No chimney smoke.

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Is there any laws about bonfires etc. I try and avoid if poss now cos I dread to think of the damage I have done to my lungs by working alongside bonfires breathing smoke in during the day. All green wood too. 

Probably more particulates released by a large bonfire in one go than wood burners burning nice dry logs.

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What an absolute load of shite! Modern wood burners are about 80% efficient and use a renewable resource. Open fires are about 20% efficient so why not target them? Wood burning is pretty much carbon neutral, and if wood is dried, then it is also very clean.

So what about natural forest fires in places like America or Australia where an area the size of the UK goes up in flames? Will they ban those too? What about volcanoes that chuck more particulates into the atmosphere than my 4.5 kw woodburner?

Diesel trucks and cars? What about the extra pressure on oil and natural gas what are not renewable?

Wood burners are insignificant compared to the real sources of pollution? But they are an easy target. I'll keep using mine until the woodburner police raise a valid prosecution.

SG

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34 minutes ago, Matthew Storrs said:

Probably more particulates released by a large bonfire in one go than wood burners burning nice dry logs.

Piece of string but in general yes because the excess air cools the flame, which is why a bonfire always has a plume of blue smoke even when burning well.

 

When I started even in our affluent bit of the country bonfires were the norm, ten years later chippers began to appear and by 1990 they were ubiquitous. Now most home owners wouldn't entertain the idea of allowing one to burn on site yet, subject to amounts and not creating dark smoke it remains legal.

 

In much the same way cigarette smoking in buildings first became frowned upon and then banned I wonder if a diesel chipper left on high idle will start attracting comments.

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1 minute ago, Stumpy Grinder said:

Wood burners are insignificant compared to the real sources of pollution?

Is that a question or rhetoric?

 

You cite a couple of accidental sources which no one can have control over whereas there are a number of ways planned and regular woodburning could be controlled, though for now I think it will only be new installs that are affected and maybe larger producers of firewood (who already are likely to have a vested interest in sales of kiln dried wood).

 

How many of us still remember the plumes of smoke rising from cereal fields in July-August prior to 1993?

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15 hours ago, Stere said:

I think they should be banned/restricted in cities if the house is on a mains gas supply.

 

 

SORRY don't agree trees will always be here gas wont,

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I live in a rural area and my stove is defra approved ( Burley Hollywell ) There is no visible smoke from the stack once it is up to temp . This was the case also a few years back when it was just an open fire  .

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11 minutes ago, Stubby said:

I live in a rural area and my stove is defra approved ( Burley Hollywell ) There is no visible smoke from the stack once it is up to temp . This was the case also a few years back when it was just an open fire  .

I dont think the particles that cause the problems are necessarily visible. Sure it must be better if run it hot and clean to the naked eye though. 

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