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Advice wanted on Poplar species


Squaredy
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1 hour ago, rapalaman said:

I’ve just felled 3 60ft ones into customers field, dumped the timber for biomass as didn’t think it was good firewood? Very wet and heavy even in 6” - 10” rings to make it easy moving them. Had three full truck loads and two of chip.

Theyre considering having another 29 down next year so may have a rethink on what to do with the trunks

So what is the going rate for logs like that going to biomass if you don't mind my asking?

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3 minutes ago, Squaredy said:

So what is the going rate for logs like that going to biomass if you don't mind my asking?

I got the convenience of an empty truck so I could carry on working 👍

I have a tip site where all chip and unwanted logs go and it was far closer to this job than dragging it all back to the yard. They then sell the chip and logs on as far as I’m aware - don’t know how much they get unfortunately 

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14 minutes ago, rapalaman said:

I got the convenience of an empty truck so I could carry on working 👍

I have a tip site where all chip and unwanted logs go and it was far closer to this job than dragging it all back to the yard. They then sell the chip and logs on as far as I’m aware - don’t know how much they get unfortunately 

Ah I see.  Certainly for 29 Poplar trees it might be worth looking for a buyer.  You near me (South Wales)?

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1 hour ago, Squaredy said:

Ah I see.  Certainly for 29 Poplar trees it might be worth looking for a buyer.  You near me (South Wales)?

Sorry will be too far away in mid Essex. May explore options on this one, hire some equipment to get them roadside. I think ringing up 29 of them and shifting would tip me over the edge 👎

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On 18/05/2022 at 19:14, Squaredy said:

Well to answer your question, the poplar I started this thread about and milled in 2018 went up for sale a year later and was all gone within a few months, so it went really well.  Even the sample board I put a photo of on this thread sold eventually despite it only being a sample as it was simply such a nice board.

 

I bought more pop from a local farmer a bit later and that is also all milled and some of it is waiting for me to use in a building I am putting up in my garden.

 

As a timber it dries well, is pretty stable and straight grained, but does have a lot of movement as it changes moisture level.  If you mill some and put it to dry properly it would be good for indoor projects where you do not need great hardness, and where the design allows for a little movement.

 

I personally think the grain is really nice and would love to see it used as kitchen cupboard doors for example.

 

From your point of view I think what you have to think about is how easy it will be to sell the timber - unless you are planning to use it all yourself.  I can manage to sell most timbers as I have footfall and if I can get any timber in front of my customers it will sell.  If you have to rely on advertising you may find it takes a very long time to sell, as people will want the better known timbers.

Thanks, that's helpful to know. It sounds like in our situation, unless anyone local (to Matlock, Derbyshire) happens to want any to mill, it wouldn't be cost effective for us to do anything with it beyond chopping it up for firewood, as we have no footfall, and even very limited passing traffic. Plus we have limited drying space until our building work is finished (though we will eventually have a barn with very low cost heat from our GSHP where we will test out drying the ash once it is milled).

 

I probably ought to ask another thread whether ash die-back affects the timber quality...

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On 18/05/2022 at 19:21, rapalaman said:

I got the convenience of an empty truck so I could carry on working 👍

I have a tip site where all chip and unwanted logs go and it was far closer to this job than dragging it all back to the yard. They then sell the chip and logs on as far as I’m aware - don’t know how much they get unfortunately 

I tip chip locally, rumour is it gets sold on for £20 a ton but I don't ask as none of my business - might also have changed due to fuel prices. We are lucky to have a reasonable size compost/biomass business fairly close, as with all these things the transport cost can easily outweigh the product value.

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  • 2 months later...
On 08/04/2019 at 19:23, Squaredy said:

One year on from milling the Poplar I started this thread about, I planed and partly finished a board to show off the grain.  I think it is rather nice.  I have sold some and will certainly buy more logs for milling one day.  

FC8E05F6-D0EF-4714-84D6-A2D504173B7E.jpeg

Ho do you keep the boards from cupping? Just keep it well weighted or do you strap your slabs of poplar? 

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3 hours ago, AJStrees said:

Ho do you keep the boards from cupping? Just keep it well weighted or do you strap your slabs of poplar? 

Always weights, straps will only work if you keep tightening them.  You should still expect some cupping with wide boards, this is why until recent times tables desks etc always used multiple boards.

 

 And of course this applies to any species, all the main uk hardwoods will potentially cup.  The softwoods are generally more stable.

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22 minutes ago, Squaredy said:

Always weights, straps will only work if you keep tightening them.  You should still expect some cupping with wide boards, this is why until recent times tables desks etc always used multiple boards.

 

 And of course this applies to any species, all the main uk hardwoods will potentially cup.  The softwoods are generally more stable.

I see 👍okay well I guess poplar will be pretty similar then. I’ve not done poplar yet but have a big black hybrid to mill up. So thought I would check. 

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