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Advice wanted on Poplar species


Squaredy
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I bought a few tons of Poplar logs from a local tree surgeon a few days ago.  Each log had a clear dark area in the middle (like you often get in Ash) which I assume is going to stay darker and will hopefully make for a more attractive board when slabbed.

 

However I have little experience of milling Poplar, does anyone know more about this?  Is it certain species which have this or all Poplars once they are mature?  They weren't especially large for Poplar (2ft diameter or so) and the tree surgeon had no idea which Poplar they were.  In case it helps I have attached a photo.  Any thoughts?  

Poplar logs.jpg

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Maybe Black Pop if cut by wet ground. Not milled any yet but i do know of a large wind blown that i might mill one day. Getting a rare tree know. Should get some nice boards. Put some pics up when you've cut some.

 

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Well it isn't rot in the logs I just bought, and in Ash it is usually just lovely olive colour timber.  

 

I had some Alder logs a while back with some crazy colours in - picture below.  Very pretty.

 

I even had a large Lime which had a really dark lovely colour through the whole heart - a gorgeous chestnut colour.  Usually of course Lime is so white it is almost featureless.

Alder board.jpg

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Hybrid poplar. Often planted as shelter belts as they grow at a tremendous rate. It's not a bad timber when milled. Moves a lot if used as cladding and shrinks more than any timber I've ever seen. I used a whole load of it to build a mezzanine within my largest barn (used as blade sharpening area). I put 30cm wide planks down as floorboards (green, and fitted flush) and by the time they dried, there were 15mm gaps between each board. 

 

Use it for unexposed, rough structural stuff, but I wouldn't bother planking it for any kind of decorative or furniture type purpose. It is very fibrous, won't take a fine finish and discolours easily when drying. 

 

Otherwise, I rate it as an outstanding firewood. Perfect compromise between hard and softwood. Lights easily, with a bright flame and good heat, but puts down a decent bed of embers too. It also dries very quickly, and would be sub 20% by July if split now.

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Well it isn't rot in the logs I just bought, and in Ash it is usually just lovely olive colour timber.  
 
I had some Alder logs a while back with some crazy colours in - picture below.  Very pretty.
 
I even had a large Lime which had a really dark lovely colour through the whole heart - a gorgeous chestnut colour.  Usually of course Lime is so white it is almost featureless.
5aca604d0f6be_Alderboard.jpg.afa564ebb4a8d54c56d20823bf9e1df0.jpg

Didn't mean it is rot but the beginnings of it: if left growing it would become rotten.
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2 hours ago, Big J said:

Hybrid poplar. Often planted as shelter belts as they grow at a tremendous rate. It's not a bad timber when milled. Moves a lot if used as cladding and shrinks more than any timber I've ever seen. I used a whole load of it to build a mezzanine within my largest barn (used as blade sharpening area). I put 30cm wide planks down as floorboards (green, and fitted flush) and by the time they dried, there were 15mm gaps between each board. 

 

Use it for unexposed, rough structural stuff, but I wouldn't bother planking it for any kind of decorative or furniture type purpose. It is very fibrous, won't take a fine finish and discolours easily when drying. 

.  Any

Otherwise, I rate it as an outstanding firewood. Perfect compromise between hard and softwood. Lights easily, with a bright flame and good heat, but puts down a decent bed of embers too. It also dries very quickly, and would be sub 20% by July if split now.

Thanks Big J that is interesting.  I have found a pic of the Lime with the coloured heart.  Anyone come across this?

Lime with colour.jpg

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