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Bustergasket

Real World Processor Output

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On 25/03/2018 at 12:17, Big J said:

Quickest way I found to process it at the time was to stack it all in a large holder (basically four fence posts hammered into the ground) and chainsaw it to length with a large CC saw. Means you have to pick it up by hand, but none of it needs to be split so it's not too bad.

We do that but have made a frame with a series of posts at 500mm centres so that we can do about half a cube at a time to produce stove logs and move the frame around as necessary

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For small stuff the Bilke takes some beating, IME the secret is running it slowly with a big tractor. Doing this you get pretty decent looking, uniform logs.

 

The mistake most people make is running it at speed, because the tractor is too small, this just produces a pile of smashed up crap.

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12 hours ago, skyhuck said:

For small stuff the Bilke takes some beating, IME the secret is running it slowly with a big tractor. Doing this you get pretty decent looking, uniform logs.

 

The mistake most people make is running it at speed, because the tractor is too small, this just produces a pile of smashed up crap.

With the bilke do you have to process it while it's still green or does it not matter too much?

also what size diameter is the real world maximum?

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1 minute ago, andy cobb said:

With the bilke do you have to process it while it's still green or does it not matter too much?

also what size diameter is the real world maximum?

Green is gentler on the machine, but it will do seasoned without issue. I do up to 8", even 8" Beech is cut with ease.

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For small stuff the Bilke takes some beating, IME the secret is running it slowly with a big tractor. Doing this you get pretty decent looking, uniform logs.
 
The mistake most people make is running it at speed, because the tractor is too small, this just produces a pile of smashed up crap.

I must say the bilke is a pretty unique machine, when you say big tractor.... how big we talking ? have u tried the electrical version ?

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3 minutes ago, Bustergasket said:


I must say the bilke is a pretty unique machine, when you say big tractor.... how big we talking ? have u tried the electrical version ?

I use my Unimog which is over 200HP, I just run it at a whisker over tickover.

 

I'm not sure what the minimum HP would be needed for decent logs, but a David Brown 885, which is around 40HP, is far to small. It will run it, but needs to be at fairly high rev's, so the wood is smashed to bits.

 

I would guess that 100HP+ would be enough.

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On 3/28/2018 at 05:56, skyhuck said:

For small stuff the Bilke takes some beating, IME the secret is running it slowly with a big tractor. Doing this you get pretty decent looking, uniform logs.

 

The mistake most people make is running it at speed, because the tractor is too small, this just produces a pile of smashed up crap.

You need the perfect wood for those machines.  Its an impressive tool to watch working though although quite expensive I thoughts.


I went for a japa in the end.  Takes me about 1 hour and a half to make a 3 cube load in my transit

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4 minutes ago, Radda said:

You need the perfect wood for those machines.  Its an impressive tool to watch working though although quite expensive I thoughts.


I went for a japa in the end.  Takes me about 1 hour and a half to make a 3 cube load in my transit

Not sure what you mean by "the perfect wood"?

 

I simply put all my small timber through mine, mostly branch wood, sure it can't be too bent, but small bends are fine and I simply cut very bent stuff in half. Its by far the fasted way of processing small timber, IMO.

 

If your processing timber of all shapes and sizes its best to have a selection of machines.

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