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Bustergasket

Real World Processor Output

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19 minutes ago, Bustergasket said:

Ok i can see that at 400 plus the logs would be getting on the large side, bet u make a big pile very quickly though

That's where the 4 minute cubic metres start to come into play. Need a massive stove though, and even then, the logs are a bit heavy to handle (just physically hard to put lengthways into the stove, even when dry).

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I did 17 cube in 4 hours on my 1x42 today. Just me, 9 inch logs into boxes, l average timber and floor swept.

That's stopping every two sticks too throw the frisby for the dog as well.

 

 

 

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9 hours ago, ash_smith123 said:

Timed 2 of us doing 12 cubic metres in 2.5 hours yesterday. Ranging between 6-12 inch diameter

4.8 /hr or 2.2 probably on your own then Ash. Is that splitting into IBC's? Now I've changed the blade I can get that myself, but someone else it drops to less than 2 per hour.

 

Of course this does not account for the oversize that has to be ringed up, moved then split.

 

When you try an 8 hour working day with 2 people were pushed to get more than average 24 when you factor in the re-split and housekeeping. A lot of hardwood is down to 4" dia. and also lots is bent.

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5 minutes ago, arboriculturist said:

 

 

Of course this does not account for the oversize that has to be ringed up, moved then split.

 

A lot of hardwood is down to 4" dia. and also lots is bent.

Yep this is our reality. They both eat time but as a small buyer beggars cant be choosers and we take what we can get.

Edited by Woodworks

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54 minutes ago, Woodworks said:

Yep this is our reality. They both eat time but as a small buyer beggars cant be choosers and we take what we can get.

The issue is I suppose that leaving the smallest material in the wood creates a lot of waste and reduces output. I remember when I was doing the hardwood thinning that I was always careful to include as much of the usable material as possible, but with the smaller stuff I'd create fair sized piles of it (10, 20 or 30 product lengths) so that the forwarder had an easier job. 

 

That being said, now I've got the processor, I can see how irritating it is. I prefer 30-35cm for maximum output though can take up to 45cm.

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38 minutes ago, Big J said:

The issue is I suppose that leaving the smallest material in the wood creates a lot of waste and reduces output. I remember when I was doing the hardwood thinning that I was always careful to include as much of the usable material as possible, but with the smaller stuff I'd create fair sized piles of it (10, 20 or 30 product lengths) so that the forwarder had an easier job. 

 

That being said, now I've got the processor, I can see how irritating it is. I prefer 30-35cm for maximum output though can take up to 45cm.

I think it's good to try to use it all. Yes small wood is slow but be shame to waste it and at least the Farmi is probably the fastest machine on the market with the small stuff.

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A lot of hardwood is down to 4" dia. and also lots is bent.

 

Due to nature of material in our region of the country, when we change the processor next we will be looking at the machine with the fastest cycle time. The Transaw has improved but not the quality of the European machines.

 

I considered modifying the current machine to give the option of 2x ram speed and 2x blade speed, which would allow switching to this option for sub 6" material, but as it's coming up to 2 years old not worth the time investment.

 

It will be the first job when I upgrade though, as will be fitting improved timber holding clamp.

Edited by arboriculturist

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9 minutes ago, Woodworks said:

I think it's good to try to use it all. Yes small wood is slow but be shame to waste it and at least the Farmi is probably the fastest machine on the market with the small stuff.

Quickest way I found to process it at the time was to stack it all in a large holder (basically four fence posts hammered into the ground) and chainsaw it to length with a large CC saw. Means you have to pick it up by hand, but none of it needs to be split so it's not too bad.

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