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Woodwanter

The science behind forced log drying

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I don't see the point in kiln drying apart from as a marketing exercise for firewood sellers.

 

Wood seasons fine in a shed just takes longer.

 

 

 

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2 hours ago, Stere said:

I don't see the point in kiln drying apart from as a marketing exercise for firewood sellers.

 

Wood seasons fine in a shed just takes longer.

 

 

 

How big is your shed 

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3 hours ago, Stere said:

I don't see the point in kiln drying apart from as a marketing exercise for firewood sellers.

 

Wood seasons fine in a shed just takes longer.

 

 

 

I don't disagree all though not sure I can't get it down to 15%? Especially in the sized material I will end up with.

 

I have the shed space to store 600 tons but it's the opportunity cost of that space which gets expensive!

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On a separate point, where is the wettest part of a log? Dropping back to my biology lessons, I always thought the outside ring (xylem or phylum vessels) which transported the nutrients up the stem were. As the tree grew the stem expanded and the centre was retained for strength and support instead. 

 

With this in mind, surely the outside 10-20% is where it all going on, the inside would be much drier, so why the need to split!?

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Yes with some species this is true, for instance Cedar of Lebanon has very wet sapwood, but fairly dry heartwood.  But I would say with most hardwoods this is not the case.  Oak, Sweet Chestnut Beech and others are very very wet right through so splitting is a good idea and will help drying.

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On getting the wood down to 15% moisture in a kiln won't it just reabsorb water  in the UK climate?

 

Look up  about equilibrium moisture content  %   :

 

 

 

 

Splitting increases the surface to volume ratio of the wood & increases the surfaces not covered in bark so wood drys faster.

 

 

Polytunnel is usful for drying wood kind of a solar kiln.

 

 

Edited by Stere

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What is a drying floor?  Not familiar with the term.

A ventilated shed floor usually for drying grain. Hot air blown through the product from below. Usually at lower temperatures than a kiln or traditional batch grain dryer but can do larger amounts in one go (depending on the size of the shed)

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About 300 m2 of surface space in one of ours, yet try it out but could pass air 30-40 degrees 24/7 with RH at 40%.

 

if I stacked it 1m tall I would get loads of air flow, tempted to try half a shed and try about 75t in a batch

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