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9 minutes ago, Peasgood said:

Willow and poplar are hardwood :)

This is true but who said it wasn't ? :)

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31 minutes ago, Peasgood said:

Willow and poplar are hardwood :)

Presume that one was aimed at me. Yes they are but they dont cost £60 per tonne either

 

I was just generalising there are always exceptions. The hardwoods we get in for firewood are oak, ash, beech, sycamore and birch. Softwoods we get are larch and douglas.

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34 minutes ago, Woodworks said:

Presume that one was aimed at me. Yes they are but they dont cost £60 per tonne either

 

I was just generalising there are always exceptions. The hardwoods we get in for firewood are oak, ash, beech, sycamore and birch. Softwoods we get are larch and douglas.

 

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I have never burnt much softwood because I was told the fumes damage the flue liner is this true?? What is lime like to burn when it is dry

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Soft wood wont damage the flue as long as it is seasoned . Lime does burn  not much flame but again needs to be seasoned .

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Thanks for the reply Stubby, there is some massive pine trees that have been felled by me and no one wants them. Looks like I will be cutting them up and bringing them home.

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14 minutes ago, Countryboy said:

I have never burnt much softwood because I was told the fumes damage the flue liner is this true?? What is lime like to burn when it is dry

Any unseasoned wood will line the flu with tar.

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All wood is good wood as long as its dried properly and it not treated in any way with crerosote etc.  

 

Today in the stove showroom I am burning POP,  cut and split a couple of years ago.  Burns well.   At home tonight I will be burning Willow in the main.

 

To the best of my knowledge only the fumes from man made smokeless fuels will damage a 316 grade flue liner especially if the stove is shut down for long intervals.   In that situation a higher grade of liner is used.   I am not aware of the fumes from any wood causing issues within a flue liner unless the fuel is wet,.  Then you get issues with blocked flues and chimney fires,

 

A

Edited by Alycidon
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1 hour ago, Alycidon said:

To the best of my knowledge only the fumes from man made smokeless fuels will damage a 316 grade flue liner especially if the stove is shut down for long intervals.

I guess that's from the sulphur burning to sulphur dioxide and then combining with condensed water to make sulphurous acid.

1 hour ago, Alycidon said:

 

  In that situation a higher grade of liner is used.   I am not aware of the fumes from any wood causing issues within a flue liner unless the fuel is wet,.  Then you get issues with blocked flues and chimney fires,

I have seen a 316 pipe pinholed, I posted a picture here, but I'm fairly confident that was because chipboard with some sort of plastic facing was being burned. Even then the only reason for perforation was that condensation was happening so all the time the flue temperature is up above the dew point there shouldn't be a problem. I used 904 ss liner when I fitted my daughter's stove just in case,

 

The thing is that if your fire is smouldering the pyrolysis products don't get burned and pyroligneous acid (vinegary brown liquid) will condense on cold surfaces. I think softwoods won't produce much vinegar if at all. Stainless doesn't fair well in anaerobic acid conditions.

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So the general opinion is yes, softwood when dried like any other firewood for sale, is perfectly acceptable. Only downside is it burns quicker, so give the customer a few more, charge the same but load em up!

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