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Big J

Petition for legislation for winter and all season tyres

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This is the situation in Germany . I think the biggest  argument is the sorter braking distance in wintery conditions . ( sometimes half )

 

 

Germany’s new winter tire law came about after a German court ruled in the case of a motorist who had protested a fine levied for not having snow tires on his car. In July 2010 the court determined that the current law was indeed too vague and that the term geeignete Bereifung (“appropriate set of tires”) failed to actually specify the use of winter tires. The man did not have to pay the fine.

The Law Regarding Snow Tires
In November 2010, responding to the court’s decision, the Bundestag, Germany’s parliament, passed a new federal law that is much more specific about winter tires. It also doubles the fines for drivers caught without snow tires or who have an accident in winter conditions without snow tires on their vehicle.

Von O bis O
Most German motorists have long known the old rule of thumb for putting snow tires on the car: “von O bis O.” The term “from O to O” is short for “from October to Easter” (von Oktober bis Ostern). It is a recommendation that one should make the change from regular tires to snow tires in October, and leave them on until Easter.

The new German law does not set any time limits, but it does clearly state that under icy conditions (bei Glatteis, Schneeglätte, Schneematsch, Eis- und Reifglätte) you must not drive without snow tires on your vehicle. So, since it’s difficult to predict the weather, for all practical purposes, the old “von O bis O” rule still applies. (In Austria, winter tires are mandatory from November 1 to April 15.)

The new law also spells out what a “winter tire” is. Specifically, it is an M+S-Reifen, a mud-and-snow tire that has an official M+S (Matsch und Schnee) marking on it. (M+S tires do not have to be “winter” tires. All-year or all-weather M+S tires also qualify.) The German automobile club ADAC recommends going a step further and getting tires with the “three-peak-mountain” seal, an indication of snow tires that meet the highest standards.

ADAC also makes another recommendation that goes beyond the minimum requirements of the law. While the Straßenverkehrsordnung (StVO) requires a minimum snow tire tread depth (Profiltiefe) of 1.6 mm, ADAC ups that to 4.0 mm.

 

 

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Can you imagine some of the stuck up mums at your local school in the BMW 4x4 out changing the wheels over when the weather changes.... Would just end up being a money making opportunity for ever tire place.
Quite agree with you j as recently I've seen more 4x4s with low profile rubber bands stuck or slipping about then ever before, isn't helped by a lot of people having no idea how to drive in anything but perfect condition because they feel protected by all the technical stuff in modern cars and just expect it to go and stop when they tell it to.
When I was in Finland they had to do a winter driving course before qualifying for a full licence, not really applicable for the condition we get but something wouldn't hurt.

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So all season tyres are a bit like all terrains on a 4x4? Ok but not the best off road and ok but not the best on road. There is always a compromise but all season m+s tyres has got to be a fair one for much of the country  

However, If like us on the Isle of Wight you only see 3 frosts a year (only just below freezing) and snow twice in the last 10 Year’s, one of these time was under half inch, the other we had 6 flakes and I think 3 of them missed then a dedicated set of winter tyres is a bit of over kill. I will just drop the tyre pressure for 2 days in the next ten years it might snow for 2min and carry on. 

However if I travel to a area they are needed I will kit up for the area as needed

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The car and driver makes a big different, most people have not driven in snow/ice or even tort how to drive in it. We have a joke were I live how may police men it take to get a police car out of are road answer is six, 1 driving and 5 pushing taking them a hour and a half to do three quarters of a mile. and the person nextdoor to me had a Audi A2 who drive straight past them with no problem. 

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....OR ...If yr bothered - put good tyres on yr car n not crash into stuff !! Winner !! ........or stay at home n drink wine - that works too :P K  ( DONT do both !!! Dont work at all ! )

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Or maybe just drive sensibly when it’s icy.
We had 2 weeks of icy roads In Wiltshire before Xmas, I have 6 miles of un treated roads to drive in the morning to work.
Would I be better to get winter tyres on and drive like a twat or take 10 minutes longer and just drive steady

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I like your second option Khriss, got up late, built a snowman, went sledging, fry up and wine for lunch, few films this afternoon with kids helped along with a few Guinness perfect snow day to me

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18 minutes ago, Khriss said:

....OR ...If yr bothered - put good tyres on yr car n not crash into stuff !! Winner !! ........or stay at home n drink wine - that works too :P K  ( DONT do both !!! Dont work at all ! )

My wife went out with my baby daughter this morning to the doctors. During the time she was out, about 4cm of snow fell. Upon returning home, she was unable to ascend the hill to our house (gentle 10% gradient for the last 40m) and it took me 10 minutes to get the car back into the drive. I know how to drive on snow, and the summer tyres that were on the car were the reason I struggled. The van (on all seasons) glided straight up.

The German laws regarding winter tyres are entirely sensible. In the UK, we spend a lot more time hovering around freezing whereas on the continent the winters tend to be colder. As such, we suffer more with black ice. If we all ran around on appropriate tyres, we'd not be at the mercy of the council gritters, lives would be saved and the economy would benefit. 

 

I appreciate that on the south coast there is a much lessened need for them, but then as a proposal, why can tyre manufacturers not offer a percentage rating on their tyres, winter/summer (like they do with all terrain tyres, offroad/onroad). If you are in the north of Scotland equip your vehicle with 70/30 winter summer tyres. If you are in the south of England 20/80 winter summer. It's surely not that difficult. Buy your tyres according to your climate and stay safe! 

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