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AWarb00

ID this fungus please?

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Hi, could someone please tell me what this fungus is?

 

a number of brackets up one side of a beech tree, signs of rot where one side of the crown has broken of a number of years ago.

 

I am wondering whether it is Ganoderma adspersum , or Ganoderma applanatum? if so is the tree a gonner? in full leaf at the moment with one or two branches of leaves starting to yellow?

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Spore size is the only reliable way to distinguish between the two species but a slice which shows flesh and tubes 'may' indicate one or the other depending on the presence of trama layers in the flesh.

 

this article looks at the two species in terms of identification

 

Ganoderma.pdf

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Spore size is the only reliable way to distinguish between the two species but a slice which shows flesh and tubes 'may' indicate one or the other depending on the presence of trama layers in the flesh.
 
this article looks at the two species in terms of identification
 
Ganoderma.pdf



Would you mind reposting that please David, the link seems to be broken my side, cheers.

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13 hours ago, David Humphries said:

Spore size is the only reliable way to distinguish between the two species but a slice which shows flesh and tubes 'may' indicate one or the other depending on the presence of trama layers in the flesh.

 

this article looks at the two species in terms of identification

 

Ganoderma.pdf

Thanks David, very helpful document, and what is the likely situation with the tree what with so many fruiting brackets, the tree is approx. 80ft tall and in close proximity to a house, should it come down?

 

Thanks,

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Just now, AWarb00 said:

Thanks David, very helpful document, and what is the likely situation with the tree what with so many fruiting brackets, the tree is approx. 80ft tall and in close proximity to a house, should it come down?

 

Thanks,

I couldn't make a judgement like that without actually seeing the tree in its situation.

 

It really all depends on which species of Gano it is.

 

If the brackets are applanatum then the mycelium is acting on dysfunctional wood volumes in a saprotrophyc nature, but if the brackets are australe/adspersum then its more likely to be actively digesting the structural wood volumes which will likely make the tree more unstable as time goes by.

 

Was the tree originally twin stemmed?

 

 

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9 minutes ago, David Humphries said:

I couldn't make a judgement like that without actually seeing the tree in its situation.

 

It really all depends on which species of Gano it is.

 

If the brackets are applanatum then the mycelium is acting on dysfunctional wood volumes in a saprotrophyc nature, but if the brackets are australe/adspersum then its more likely to be actively digesting the structural wood volumes which will likely make the tree more unstable as time goes by.

 

Was the tree originally twin stemmed?

 

 

ok, ill see if I can go back to the site and have a closer look now knowing how to tell between the two after reading the document posted, if it is australe which seems more likely after reading the document then does that mean the tree is quite likely rotten in the centre?

 

the tree originally split into 3 about 10 feet or so off the ground, but both outer sides have split off at some stage in its life (years ago looking at the stage of rot) leaving the one central stem.  

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looks like both species to me, and very extensive decay.

 

If this trees already had a history of failure and now cleary shows very extensive stem rot there is little to do but the obvious. This beech tree is cleary about to finish its life cycle, but lets not forgetthe other life cycles within that continue or even begin once the tree actualy dies or dies as a result of the failure.

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On ‎04‎/‎09‎/‎2017 at 12:21, David Humphries said:

G. australe would not be good.

 

How exposed is the tree at its current height?

 

 

 

 

there's conifer hedges to about halfway up behind it, the front is exposed, as with the top half.

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