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Is 35 too old to start a career as a tree surgeon?

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7 hours ago, John Shutler said:

oh yeah, i forgot about all those perks 🙄

If it werent fr the romance - I would have chucked it in years ago :P  K

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7 hours ago, lux said:

Quite frankly trimming huge hedges 15 ft across off the top of stepladders with the telescopic hedge trimmer held horizontally all day is more knackering than most climbs.

So true. I am 60 now and still do most of our climbing, but there is no way I can mange the wide hedges any more. I leave that to the young ones with more strength than me. Most days the groundies have a harder time than I do up the trees.

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So true. I am 60 now and still do most of our climbing, but there is no way I can mange the wide hedges any more. I leave that to the young ones with more strength than me. Most days the groundies have a harder time than I do up the trees.

For sure. When there is no way of getting any mechanical assistance on a job and it’s down to dragging branches and carrying logs ground work no doubt saps the legs more. Plenty a good enough reason for the op to learn to climb quickly
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8 hours ago, Khriss said:

For the romance, clean living and fat wage packet you fool. K

where aboots  is they jobs then khriss,    ooooh you wis just kiddn on.

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Quite honestly as a generalisation this industry loves to moan and blow smoke up its own arse about how skilled we are. Etc etc. It’s perhaps only the physical nature of the work that sets us apart from other trades.
In reality anyone who is physically fit and is a hands on practical person with some good sense will grasp the motor skills needed to do this job. Maybe it’s the dangling from a bit of rope feeling like an action hero that gives people a raised perception of what’s required.
If the OP was going to learn to plaster or lay bricks at 35 people wouldn’t say much. Most of us couldn’t leave a mirror finish plaster and no doubt if I laid a big brick wall it would be as bent as 9 bob note.
Climbing and cutting trees is a skill for sure but it’s not building a space ship. I recon at 35 he’s got some miles left on the clock and if it makes him happier then give it a bash. Good luck to him.

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54 minutes ago, struie said:

where aboots  is they jobs then khriss,    ooooh you wis just kiddn on.

Drive down from Hawick, aim fr Kershope. Long road thru Penton. Thats where i mean .. Was for me anyway * sigh *   K

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35 is way to late if you want to make a production/freelance climber .. by the time you have got any skill set worth paying you will be 40 and every sporting injury will come out or worse arthritis .. at this point you may have enough skill set to cope with most trees you still won’t have 10+ years that it takes in my view to even grasp the characteristics of different timber and it’s conditions, seriously I would give this a lot of thought as I’ve seen people come in at there mid 30’s and 40’s tired of office work and doing out door work has finished them , unless they have vast funds of family fortunes to squander.

Why is 35 way too late? Depends on the person and their drive. I started at 40, I was fit as a butchers dog and driven by a desire to succeed that I’ve had all through my life ( ex Bootneck and NHS Paramedic ) If he’s got the drive to succeed then that will help, I’m near the end of my Arb career at nearly 60 but I’ve enjoyed every minute of it and still am, I’ve got from it things that I would never had if I had stayed a Paramedic, I have a healthy successful company and a not so healthy knackered body .

Go for it I say and good luck.

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12 hours ago, John Shutler said:

why do you want to get into the tree industry?

Is it too deep to say because I like trees and plants and seem to have some inate skill in growing and tending to most things that grow.  I am also no longer able to work in an indoor environment due to certain health issues.  I am also not tied down by a wife or children.  I am a free agent and can go anywhere and practically do anything in the entire world.

 

Honestly i'm not sure I will ever be a tree surgeon in the same way as most of the people on here.  I am drawn more to the science side of things.  Sure its nice to climb trees and its nice to play with chainsaws and strip them and rebuild them.  I do the same with my motorcycle and car.  Its not rocket science.  But I do enjoy the theory side more than climbing and cutting.  If I got to the end and never climbed a tree, I would be a little sad maybe, but its not the end of the world.  I could have a successful career and never climb a tree or cut a log.  Does every Arborist only climb trees and chop them?  I thought some of you did tree surveys, worked in tree nurseries, worked on pest control, advised on planting, worked in plantations maintaining tree stocks, worked for DEFRA, worked as tree officers within councils, tree scientists within Arboretums.  Yes i get that this forum seems to be more aimed at the people who cut and climb, but are there not other parts to being an Arborist, other career paths that don't include climbing and cutting?   From everything I've read and the Arbs I talked to prior to making this decision, its a lot more than lets climb this tree and lop limbs off it.  Some people choose to never climb, but instead choose to manage.  Some choose to pursue careers in the science of pests and diseases, some do soil, some work on the hybridisation of trees, some do surveys, some do planning.  Lots of paths to progression.  I really want a path that makes a difference.  There are a lot of people who cut and climb, so trying to get a foothold in an already saturated market would be crazy.  At least in the UK.  I might have more luck abroad.  In fact I do intend to work abroad after I finish.  Not sure where yet, but I have family in Canada and Australia and getting work visas for either of those two countries is a lot less hassle when you have relatives that are permanent residents.

 

In short I don't limit my view to, I must climb trees and start a chainsaw everyday.  I look at the entire picture and decide what works for me.  From what you've said cutting and climbing is a young mans career path.  So I should leave it to young people and experienced people.  Instead I should focus on a different area.

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Is it too deep to say because I like trees and plants and seem to have some inate skill in growing and tending to most things that grow.  I am also no longer able to work in an indoor environment due to certain health issues.  I am also not tied down by a wife or children.  I am a free agent and can go anywhere and practically do anything in the entire world.
 
Honestly i'm not sure I will ever be a tree surgeon in the same way as most of the people on here.  I am drawn more to the science side of things.  Sure its nice to climb trees and its nice to play with chainsaws and strip them and rebuild them.  I do the same with my motorcycle and car.  Its not rocket science.  But I do enjoy the theory side more than climbing and cutting.  If I got to the end and never climbed a tree, I would be a little sad maybe, but its not the end of the world.  I could have a successful career and never climb a tree or cut a log.  Does every Arborist only climb trees and chop them?  I thought some of you did tree surveys, worked in tree nurseries, worked on pest control, advised on planting, worked in plantations maintaining tree stocks, worked for DEFRA, worked as tree officers within councils, tree scientists within Arboretums.  Yes i get that this forum seems to be more aimed at the people who cut and climb, but are there not other parts to being an Arborist, other career paths that don't include climbing and cutting?   From everything I've read and the Arbs I talked to prior to making this decision, its a lot more than lets climb this tree and lop limbs off it.  Some people choose to never climb, but instead choose to manage.  Some choose to pursue careers in the science of pests and diseases, some do soil, some work on the hybridisation of trees, some do surveys, some do planning.  Lots of paths to progression.  I really want a path that makes a difference.  There are a lot of people who cut and climb, so trying to get a foothold in an already saturated market would be crazy.  At least in the UK.  I might have more luck abroad.  In fact I do intend to work abroad after I finish.  Not sure where yet, but I have family in Canada and Australia and getting work visas for either of those two countries is a lot less hassle when you have relatives that are permanent residents.
 
In short I don't limit my view to, I must climb trees and start a chainsaw everyday.  I look at the entire picture and decide what works for me.  From what you've said cutting and climbing is a young mans career path.  So I should leave it to young people and experienced people.  Instead I should focus on a different area.


Go for it, with age comes experience and hopefully common sense. Caution can help in this game over being 19 and immortal in your head.

I did my climbing ticket before my saw tickets and rec climbed as often as i could. If you decide you sent keen then you have had a fun week, spent £750 or so and learnt something.
The ability to self learn and be open to being taught will help you no end.

Having a basic grasp of an Arbs day to day would benefit you in many of the roles you suggest.

Modern climbing kit takes the brutal joint killing masochism of 3 knot systems and thrusting your way up a rope! I’ve taken friends climbing and even the unfit none sporty ones with SRT and ascenders are quickly up into the canopy.
It’s a different world up there
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