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Cordless Stihl v Makita v Other

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Recommendations and thoughts appreciated for a battery saw for coppice work (4" - 8" poles in the main) and occasional hedgerow maintenance. I can't think that the batteries would be used for anything else so the full set up of charger, batteries and saw would be just for this task.

 

Stihl, Makita or Something else?

 

Top handle or rear handle?

 

 

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I have the top handle husky. The rear handle is essentially the same.

 

one thing you may find useful is the economy setting, slower chain speed but longer battery life.

 

The bar and chain are very fragile so under pressure hazel stems could make short work of them.

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Do you share the batteries with other units? would you stick with Husky if you had to buy again? Ta.

 

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I have three batteries, which will get me through most days, but, and it's a big but, it's only on specific jobs (and wood) there's not enough poke to power through hard wood consistently.

 

I have no other units but I think the hedge cutter might be nice for light trimming.

 

Would I buy another Husky? Yes, but you have to choose early because of course the batteries aren't interchangeable between the marques.

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Makita cordless saws are well made and the batteries are interchangeable with their whole cordless range. They have adaptors so that 36v batteries can be made with 2 12v ones, which is ideal if you already have a few makita tools (if you don't, I can recommend them as being easily as good as DeWalt stuff). The only negatives to the Makita saws are the lower chainspeeds compared to the Stihl/Husq cordless stuff, but if you aren't requiring formula one cutting speeds then the much cheaper price (as you can buy unit only if you have the right batteries) then I'd go for the Makita.

 

 

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I discovered it by accident, was doing a conny hedge, hundreds of 2" cuts, half way though I thought to myself "my battery should be empty by now" and it was half full. I had pressed the e button without knowing it.

 

In those situations, no requirement for fast cutting i.e. All stems were vertical, softish wood it can help.

Edited by Mick Dempsey

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I've used the mak for a day, it's not really suitable as a forestry tool in any way. Because of the way it's made batts on the back of the tool) the balance is so bad, it's verging on being dangerous, and this makes it unpleasant to use.

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I have the makita shown in the video above , and find it a very useful tool indeed ( i have quite a few makita tools so already had batteries and charger )  I have used it on smallish hedge laying jobs , deadwooding conifers and various pruning jobs and for when making rustic furniture , also great to keep handy when chipping for the odd awkward bit that needs a quick cut ,  however the relatively  slow chain speed makes it feel like it is jumping from one cutter to the next  , so if you are realistic about its limitations they are very handy indeed ....but like others have said not really a forestry tool ...

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1 minute ago, devon TWiG said:

I have the makita shown in the video above , and find it a very useful tool indeed ( i have quite a few makita tools so already had batteries and charger )  I have used it on smallish hedge laying jobs , deadwooding conifers and various pruning jobs and for when making rustic furniture , also great to keep handy when chipping for the odd awkward bit that needs a quick cut ,  however the relatively  slow chain speed makes it feel like it is jumping from one cutter to the next  , so if you are realistic about its limitations they are very handy indeed ....but like others have said not really a forestry tool ...

It's a great tool!

Just not the tool for this job.

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