Jump to content
StuartM

Battery landscaping tools

Recommended Posts

like i said for me i wouldnt go battery unless i have to, not being funny to the likes of stihl and husky equipment, but i do a lot of landscaping and fencing and used all of the big names in battery equipment millwake bosh dewalt makita and other brands. Even with the new generation batteries the more times you charge them the less use time you end up getting from the battery and weather can kill them to getting to hot or freezing cold, and these guys have been doing battery tools for more years than husky and stihl combined in there battery eventure

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
like i said for me i wouldnt go battery unless i have to, not being funny to the likes of stihl and husky equipment, but i do a lot of landscaping and fencing and used all of the big names in battery equipment millwake bosh dewalt makita and other brands. Even with the new generation batteries the more times you charge them the less use time you end up getting from the battery and weather can kill them to getting to hot or freezing cold, and these guys have been doing battery tools for more years than husky and stihl combined in there battery eventure

 

Interesting to keep hearing from folk saying the more you keep charging the less time you get from your Battery .... .well coming up to 3 years and both Batteries are still has strong has when I bought them .

 

Ste

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Even if a battery only lasted two years it's a consumable so shouldn't it be compared to the cost of fuel you would have used over the two years?

 

As mentioned earlier, I would like to see what a brush cutter or hedge trimmer can handle first. My little domestic Stihl battery saw is great at small cutting jobs, with the battery lasting ages but if I start cutting 6"+ logs it'll run down very quickly.

 

I would consider a battery brush cutter myself and would be interested to hear how they cope with rough grass, brambles etc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I would consider a battery brush cutter myself and would be interested to hear how they cope with rough grass, brambles etc.

 

I use one of the straight shaft cordless strimmer everyday for edging and that's has far has it goes .....edging.

They tie themselves in a knot on anything bigger.

Absolutely great for maintenance.

 

Ste

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I use one of the straight shaft cordless strimmer everyday for edging and that's has far has it goes .....edging.

 

They tie themselves in a knot on anything bigger.

 

Absolutely great for maintenance.

 

 

 

Ste

 

 

Yes I have recently bought a husky 115li and it's great for edging and long grass which is all it's intended for. It's a great bit of kit but anything heavy and the ear defence and 2 stroke come out.

 

All in all I think it's a step in the right direction, well pleased with it it is a cracking bit of kit that has its place.

 

Sort of like having a top handle and an 880 same tool different uses.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I didn't want to look at the battery powered equipment -t-handle saw in my case- at first as well. Working at a few sound sensitive locations I thought I give it a try. This was about 2 years ago. Whenever I do not need the extra power of the heavier petrol chainsaws I will take the e-saw

 

-Stihl for me, but just because my supplier is a friend as well and his shop close to home-

 

Bought the hedgecutter a few months back. Don't do a lot of hedges, but use it whenever I can. Strong enough for most jobs.

 

I have two batteries and a speedcharger I can plug in in the truck. Never had a problem, and after two years the battery is about the same as it was new.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Arbtalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Both stihl and husky have demonstration models for you to take and try. I have tried the strimmer and disc cutter, I don't own either

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had a trip over to Honey Brothers to have a look yesterday I ended up coming home with a few bits from the Husky range. After charging up the batteries I only had time for a quick test of the brush cutter but first impressions are good, plenty of power and nice and quiet. Got to wait until the weekend to give it a proper test along with the hedge trimmer but I'm happy so far.

 

In the end I decided that for the jobs I do I can work round the run time limitations and if I really need to I can borrow my mates KM131.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've got two saws and a short hedgetrimmer, all Husky and all in the 536 range, which are the most powerful and I'm pleased with them all.

 

The hedgetrimmer has no problems with many of the larger bits of hedge which the 2-stroke used to struggle over.

 

My whinge at the moment though is that I'm trying to get the pole hedgetrimmer and the strimmer but the delivery dates to the dealers from Husqvarna just seem to be getting further away each time I've asked what's happening.

 

The latest estimate is some time in October, though I ordered both at the beginning of August.  Surprising as Husqvarna has such a good reputation.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Featured Adverts

About

Arbtalk.co.uk is a hub for the arboriculture industry in the UK.  
If you're just starting out and you need business, equipment, tech or training support you're in the right place.  If you've done it, made it, got a van load of oily t-shirts and have decided to give something back by sharing your knowledge or wisdom,  then you're welcome too.
If you would like to contribute to making this industry more effective and safe then welcome.
Just like a living tree, it'll always be a work in progress.
Please have a look around, sign up, share and contribute the best you have.

See you inside.

The Arbtalk Team

Follow us

×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.