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The stuff we have around here (a regular 'crop' is dug out of really top quality moss land after being hit with a plough as the land shrinks or the drainer.

 

The oak is like rock, sparks fly (even after a long bout of pressure washing) and chains don't last long at all. It will be inetersting to see how you get on with yours.

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It needs to be milled soon after retrieving to minimise star shakes..... If it starts to dry in the round you will lose a lot.

 

Mill as normal but sticker with 10-15mm thick sticks and air dry somewhere sheltered, preferably inside to lower air flow and thus slow drying.

 

It can be delicate and temperamental stuff

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Was speaking this last weekend to someone who has milled and dried some succesfully. He said that most people who have sweated to work out a sensible method don't readily tell how they did it (neither die he :D ). As Stomp says, start very oversized, the figures given were something like milled at 52mm, dried to 44mm, planed to 32mm after removing wonkiness.

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I am somewhat envious. I would like to get my hands on a bit to make a box I designed over 25 years ago! It seems to be commonly found by farmers but unsurprisingly the chain from farmer to mill is hard to create.

 

Have you seen the millennium table project?

 

Alec

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Now tracked it down. It's the fenland black oak project for the diamond jubilee - there's a thread on here called something like huge oak tree milled in the fens which also covers the drying process but I can't post a link from my phone.

 

Alec

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I cut some recently for a guy who lived up in the bog lands of Co.Offally. Truly was bog oak unlike some of the other black/brown timbers often sold here as oak. Anyway it was ssooo hard, very fragile , dusty as hell and took the edge of the bandsaw in seconds even after being pressure washed. Loads of sparks - is part of the wood replaced by silica or something during its time in the bog ?

He gave me a couple of pieces from it which one day I'll get around to making something with. I think I'll stick to cutting fresh wood though !

Shaun

 

Sent from my GT-I9505 using Arbtalk mobile app

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Hi, I've been looking into water jet cutting {for metal} but while looking online I noticed some stuff about folks cutting wood this way, perhaps if you could get it to a size that the machines would accept it may be worth a try, interestingly enough Nottingham seems to have several companies and the university involved in doing this type of work, ....just a thought.

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