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Goats and trees

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I've got geese, they are brilliant at keeping grass down but I am not convinced they wouldn't harm a tree. Not as much as a goat would though.

Our geese would eat the bark of any stem or twig smaller than about 3".

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Our geese would eat the bark of any stem or twig smaller than about 3".

 

I want to put mine into my orchard, I guess the trunks are around the 3" mark or bigger. What would you think I could do to stop them eating the trees?

I use chicken wire tree guards to keep the rabbits off but reckon the geese can reach over it.

 

This is 15 geese at the mo in a 3 acre orchard. It is my plan to achieve world domination by breeding geese and growing apples.

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I want to put mine into my orchard, I guess the trunks are around the 3" mark or bigger. What would you think I could do to stop them eating the trees?

I use chicken wire tree guards to keep the rabbits off but reckon the geese can reach over it.

 

This is 15 geese at the mo in a 3 acre orchard. It is my plan to achieve world domination by breeding geese and growing apples.

They'd probably be fine in that scenario.

Mine were among newly planted trees where only the thickest were near 3"

 

Sent from my E5823 using Arbtalk mobile app

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We have a feral herd on some commonage behind our forest. Its an over-grown sitka plantation, some of the trees are two feet across and the goats have them wrecked. Never underestimate a goat.

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Thanks for all the comments folks. I do love my goats and they are real characters but there can't be a goat owner out there who hasn't at some considered ending the crafty buggers! I took the lead comment in good humour.

 

The area is young hazel coppice and they have about a years growth on them but are surrounded by bramble which is making extracting the timber difficult. Of course, I should have removed it all at the time but the nature of the site and lack of machinery at that time made it difficult. At the end of the day, a few evenings with the strimmer will clear it up but I just figured goats might be a win / win. They get fed, I get access. But not at the expense of the trees. My only thought was if I left it until Autumn when the leaves have dropped, would they be less of a target for the goats or will they just attack the stems anyway. I know with some stuff like the sycamore branches I often cut and throw them indoors on a rainy day, they will strip the bark completely.

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Trees and leaves have been around for millions of years. Grasses are comparatively modern species. That's why most "grazing" animals will eat leaves when given opportunity.

Goats can get ill if they eat too many tannin laden leaves though.

 

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Arbtalk

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Trees and leaves have been around for millions of years. Grasses are comparatively modern species. That's why most "grazing" animals will eat leaves when given opportunity.

Goats can get ill if they eat too many tannin laden leaves though.

 

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Arbtalk

I'm gonna have to call bollox on that theory.

 

Grasses were around when there were Dino's. Pretty much all mammalian life has evolved after the Dino's threw in the towel.

Theres evidence to suggest grasses were around 120million years ago.

 

Sent from my E5823 using Arbtalk mobile app

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Will pigs not eat the geese?

 

sent from my phone but never in work time.

 

They will, but very very rarely.

I know a person who keeps pigs and hens together, in a polytunnel in winter so close quarters.

He says the pigs only eat the hens when they annoy them, ie stand on top of the sleeping pig, pecking the pigs face and such. Then the pigs may take a swift snap and if they get one they'll eat it but they don't actively pursue them.

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