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150 ft Redwood Removal - Italy

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13 hours ago, Rich Rule said:

 

 

Do do you agree or not,¬†that multiple rings equals multiple friction points through the crown rather than one point of friction at the base?ÔĽŅ

Yes, I agree¬†ūüĎć

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42 minutes ago, stihlmadasever said:

Are some really trying to argue with the climber about the height of the tree he climbed?

Really?

Ffs... 

Yes, but currently  it is only the 1 doubter that has piped up in the last 10 years or so.

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On 04/03/2019 at 11:47, Climbergiorgio said:

It's cool that you know the exact high of the tree even if none of you were there... I've already said that using a wide angle camera, it modify the real size. 

It was not possible to use wedges and let the pieces go with no control, 'cause the tree was on a slope, there was the risk to make them rolling to the street.

 

As I said you did some beautiful work Giorgio,  so please don’t take my comment with offense. Just trying to keep it real.  My guestimation is based on the fact that I have spent my entire life living and working among Redwoods in the 125-250 ft. 

 

mdvaden figured the tree was 100 ft, and based on his amazing pictures I would imagine he has spent a fair amount of time looking at 150 ft trees?

 

As neither of us was there, who are we to argue.  If you say it was 150ft, then a 150 ft it is!

 

You clearly have no idea what I'm talking about when I speak of the teeter totter with wedges trick. It is not used to wedge over pieces, but a crafty, old school way of using wedges to keep the weight off your saw through the entire cut. Super simple, and particular effective when cutting potato chip pieces off a big spar. When done cutting, the wedges also make sliding the piece of the spar much easier.  Toss it to the ground, into a vertical speed-line, or into a lowering line. Whatever floats your boat. This technique also works wonders when taking big vertical logs with a crane, or when making a flush cut on a big stump.  

 

Instead of trying to explain this very simple technique, I will make a short vid when it stops raining here.

 

 

Edited by Erik

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On 05/03/2019 at 04:30, stihlmadasever said:

Are some really trying to argue with the climber about the height of the tree he climbed?

Really?

Ffs... 

As one of the offending members,  I have seen the error of my ways and would like to apologize for any harm my comment might have inflicted. 

 

In my defense I never received the memo stating that the questioning of another members possible over-estimation of the height of a tree was out of bounds. 

 

Duly noted, and it will never happen again.   

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3 hours ago, Erik said:

As I said you did some beautiful work Giorgio,  so please don’t take my comment with offense. Just trying to keep it real.  My guestimation is based on the fact that I have spent my entire life living and working among Redwoods in the 125-250 ft. 

 

mdvaden figured the tree was 100 ft, and based on his amazing pictures I would imagine he has spent a fair amount of time looking at 150 ft trees?

 

As neither of us was there, who are we to argue.  If you say it was 150ft, then a 150 ft it is!

 

You clearly have no idea what I'm talking about when I speak of the teeter totter with wedges trick. It is not used to wedge over pieces, but a crafty, old school way of using wedges to keep the weight off your saw through the entire cut. Super simple, and particular effective when cutting potato chip pieces off a big spar. When done cutting, the wedges also make sliding the piece of the spar much easier.  Toss it to the ground, into a vertical speed-line, or into a lowering line. Whatever floats your boat. This technique also works wonders when taking big vertical logs with a crane, or when making a flush cut on a big stump.  

 

Instead of trying to explain this very simple technique, I will make a short vid when it stops raining here.

 

 

I just cut the slices at an angle so they slide off, I‚Äôm usually too lazy to put in a wedge and put my shoulder against an edge when on the last bit and just burn through the last few mm, the steeper the cut the less it sits back. ¬†It¬†certainly doesn‚Äôt work that way when on big¬†stuff and my big stuff will be your small stuff.ūüėÄ

  50-60 degrees is king if you can get away with it as any steeper means a lot more cutting and depends on how far you can reach up on your spikes .

  Look forward to the teeter totter wedge trick!

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Agree that on smaller stuff wedges are usually not necessary, and a slight angle can certainly help.

 As the teeter totter is ultra simple I am going to attempt to describe it. You start cutting through your wood and continue until the wood begins to sit down fairly hard on your saw, which is always beyond centerline. At this point you tap a wedge in right behind the bar near the tip, and you also tap a wedge in right behind the bar near the power head. First you just lifted the wood off your bar, and since the wedges are well beyond the halfway point you have created a tether totter effect which will allow the heavier wood behind the wedges to simply lift the wood off your bar as you finish your cut.  Works like butter and is an extremely effective cut when your are forced to cut tator chips in bigger wood, as seen in Giorgio’s vid. A caveman simple technique that every treeman should have in his toolbox. 

 Hopefully I made this clear, but if not I will make a vid soon.

 

 

Edited by Erik
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I've actually seen a thin rod used for the same purpose. Cut most of the way through, insert rod beyond bar and carry on. Also helps roll the slice off and you don't have to spike round to the nose of your bar for the second wedge

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