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Any new small charcoal retorts out there?

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Scrub that. Looking further down the tables in your link I think I get it now. The 400 grades may have lower working temperature but will suffer less due to expansion and shrinkage?

Please keep it simple as this is way over my head :001_smile:

 

I've been looking at similar things (will do the first firing of our brick built Adam retort after Easter). We just needed a steel sheet for the bottom plate. In the end went for ss304 as will last longer than mild steel. Better suited would've been ss309 or ss310 or ideally ss430; It came down to cost for us.

SS304 £142 for a 1250x 2500 x 3mm sheet, or ss310 (couldn't get 309 in the size from our local supplier) for £397. Didn't dare ask re ss430 after that quote.

Hope that helps otherwise sorry for sticking my oar in.

Ernie.

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I've been looking at similar things (will do the first firing of our brick built Adam retort after Easter). We just needed a steel sheet for the bottom plate. In the end went for ss304 as will last longer than mild steel. Better suited would've been ss309 or ss310 or ideally ss430; It came down to cost for us.

SS304 £142 for a 1250x 2500 x 3mm sheet, or ss310 (couldn't get 309 in the size from our local supplier) for £397. Didn't dare ask re ss430 after that quote.

Hope that helps otherwise sorry for sticking my oar in.

Ernie.

 

Very welcome Ernie :001_smile:

 

I think the prototype is just going to be mild steel with steel liner that will be sacrificial. If all works as hoped will look closer at stainless prices. Quote for 304 quadrupled the price for the parts I am getting quotes on :w00t:

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A good idea to build the prototype in mild steel - you really don't want to be using expensive materials to test the theory and make design changes in.

 

Yes, you've got it on the ferritic stainless steels. They will suffer less because of the reduced expansion, but also because they conduct the heat better so the outside surface won't actually get as hot. They are also a lot cheaper than the austenitic grades (300 series) as they don't contain nickel. I would look at grade 410 (technically martensitic rather than ferritic but you really don't want to know....), otherwise known as EN 1.4006. It does exist as sheet but not sure where you would get it - Outokompu would be a good starting point.

 

Alec

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A good idea to build the prototype in mild steel - you really don't want to be using expensive materials to test the theory and make design changes in.

 

Yes, you've got it on the ferritic stainless steels. They will suffer less because of the reduced expansion, but also because they conduct the heat better so the outside surface won't actually get as hot. They are also a lot cheaper than the austenitic grades (300 series) as they don't contain nickel. I would look at grade 410 (technically martensitic rather than ferritic but you really don't want to know....), otherwise known as EN 1.4006. It does exist as sheet but not sure where you would get it - Outokompu would be a good starting point.

 

Alec

 

Thanks Alec

 

Materials are now being ordered so something is going to get made :001_smile:

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A portable version on a 750KG single axle trailer would be ideal. I would like to collect wood tars to use for various products.

 

Tars would be burnt off in my retort. Can any retort preserve tars? would have thought they all run too hot

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Tars would be burnt off in my retort. Can any retort preserve tars? would have thought they all run too hot

 

Yes, they can. Traditional Swedish tar production effectively burned the wood in a retort but rather than burning the gas it was piped off and everything condensed in turn, allowing the collection of tar, turpentine and methanol (wood alcohol).

 

A retort running at the correct temperature will release tars etc. along with the gas. If you pipe them straight back around they all get burned but if you were to pipe the gas through a heat exchanger (such as a copper coil in a big tub of water) they would condense out and could be collected, allowing the gas to go back in and sustain combustion.

 

Alec

 

Alec

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Yes, they can. Traditional Swedish tar production effectively burned the wood in a retort but rather than burning the gas it was piped off and everything condensed in turn, allowing the collection of tar, turpentine and methanol (wood alcohol).

 

A retort running at the correct temperature will release tars etc. along with the gas. If you pipe them straight back around they all get burned but if you were to pipe the gas through a heat exchanger (such as a copper coil in a big tub of water) they would condense out and could be collected, allowing the gas to go back in and sustain combustion.

 

Alec

 

Alec

OK think I get that, thanks :thumbup1:

 

 

First and most expensive single component turned up today. Couldn't find a cheap suitable option and least should see out several retorts :laugh1:

IMG_20170323_185919.jpg.e495c7a956ff9d53680e96ae70c240fb.jpg

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