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Alexandr Fedoseev

Fail. Sling crash.

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Thanks for sharing. Do you know the weights involved etc?

 

Yes, this question we studied. Becket was kept in poor conditions and rotten. We did not consider this factor.

The safety margin is 30-40% of the maximum.

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The sling giving up may have been a blessing in disguise, far better than the crane going over.

 

Glad no one was hurt or any damage caused.

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Seen loads of slings go usaly lifting cold rolled packs and a bite been used causing it to cut through only ever seen one chain break and that was on a demolition job where the colum had one nit left on the holding down plate the Crain was a 200t and light chains were been used on columns the driver had his head right over the colum the chain was left stretched so much that it stood up.

Did wake the driver up.

 

Seen stuff fall because an open chain was used before the days of gates

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Out of interest why was a crane being used since everything was being put at the bottom of the tree, and those pieces all looked lowerable?

 

The tree is so old that the wood is very brittle. When the branch is lowered down, these branches often break from hitting the tree trunk (they are very heavy). On the ground was a building, drop down the branches gently only possible using a crane.

Edited by Alexandr Fedoseev

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Hmmh. In the offshore industry, chains are never used for lifting and rigging purposes. And for good reason....difficult to inspect properly without use of specialist non destructive testing techniques. Webbing and round slings are used a lot. But competent inspection is essential. For large loads wire slings are used.

 

But am I an expert................

 

I am of the same opinion as you.

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Back to the original Visio, looked to me like the pick was just too big, why did you go from pretty concervative lifts to what looked to be a huge section of trunk?

 

You wonder why we hang such a large piece of wood? That's my fault. I succumbed to the entreaties of the crane driver. We work together a couple of years, he is an experienced specialist, but people sometimes make mistakes. Now, this is my experience.

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Yes, this question we studied. Becket was kept in poor conditions and rotten. We did not consider this factor.

The safety margin is 30-40% of the maximum.

 

It's hard to judge but looking at the video and the size of the timber in relation to you and the length of it it could of weighed 3ton, that looks like a 3 ton maybe 5ton sling which is choked so lowering its strength, I presume you used it throughout the job it appeared to take a few shock loads potentially weakening the fibres, also did the crane driver load it up before pick? Had a crane driver once who liked to tension the hell out of everything I cut, bits were jumping everywhere - a few words at break and to crane company and we never had him again.

 

All this just a guess on my part.

 

To be fair most of the time when craning we use 2 slings to be on the safe side. I have only ever once used a single soft sling on a big pick and that was with a driver I know well and trusted.

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