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Another question if you don't mind

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Ukulian   

Echo CS281 with 10" Sugihara R7 using the Stihl 0.043 1/4 chain with the heels ground off the teeth.

Echo CS 280, 12" Tsumura bar running Oregon 1/4 .050, also with heels of teeth knocked off.

:) :)

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Echo CS281 with 10" Sugihara R7 using the Stihl 0.043 1/4 chain with the heels ground off the teeth.

Echo CS 280, 12" Tsumura bar running Oregon 1/4 .050, also with heels of teeth knocked off.

:) :)

 

So, if you don't mind me diverting the thread a little, why knock off the heels of the teeth and how do you do that?

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wisewood   
So, if you don't mind me diverting the thread a little, why knock off the heels of the teeth and how do you do that?

 

Ok, because the radius of the dime tip is so tight, the heel of each cutter kicks out as it travels round the tip of the bar.you need to grind about 2-3 mm off so it's arc around the tip is lower than the arc of the cutting edge.

Not doing this will prevent you from bore cutting and will generate a lot more heat/wear on both bar and chain.

The grinding can be done with an angle grinder(carefully), a power file or one of the granburg electric chain sharpeners. If you trawl through my threads I posted a vid of the latter about a year back.

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Ok, because the radius of the dime tip is so tight, the heel of each cutter kicks out as it travels round the tip of the bar.you need to grind about 2-3 mm off so it's arc around the tip is lower than the arc of the cutting edge.

Not doing this will prevent you from bore cutting and will generate a lot more heat/wear on both bar and chain.

The grinding can be done with an angle grinder(carefully), a power file or one of the granburg electric chain sharpeners. If you trawl through my threads I posted a vid of the latter about a year back.

Very interesting, I wouldn't have thought of that. I will give that a go.

Do any of you use die grinders or mini grinders? Are they worth investing in? I see Axminster tools do a proton long neck mini grinder for just over £100 and a "pro die grinder" for £90. Any thoughts?

 

Sent from my XT1580 using Arbtalk mobile app

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Ianw6522   
Very interesting, I wouldn't have thought of that. I will give that a go.

Do any of you use die grinders or mini grinders? Are they worth investing in? I see Axminster tools do a proton long neck mini grinder for just over £100 and a "pro die grinder" for £90. Any thoughts?

 

Sent from my XT1580 using Arbtalk mobile app

 

My advice is to not try and reach for the power tools too early, work at it and use the chainsaw as much as you can before turning to the power tools, your skill with the saw will improve if you do this.

 

However , i had a proton on 2 occassions and they both burnt out, most probably my own fault by expecting too much of them. I bought the makita die grinder which is an excellent tool if used with sabaturr bits. I also use the makita finger sander which is superb for the detail and gives you good access without restricting you too much.

 

Thats my advice to your question for what its worth, practice practice practice with that chainsaw:biggrin:

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I use a Stihl ms200 with canon dime tip carving bar.

I personally believe that it is worth investing in power tools you should always be carving a little fatter when you start out. If it takes power tools to get it to how you want it to look without you making a mistake and you ending with the result you'd hoped for then it's all good. Once you've produced a few you will find that your getting closer and closer to the finished piece before you've picked up a power tool.

I have 4" angle grinder arbotech mini grinder (similar to proton), dewalt die grinder with a long neck, power file, dremel with easy extension hand tool, a couple of battery drills and that's about it. Oh and a decent dust mask!!!

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Ukulian   

[ame=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KGjNAAFoCKE&t=868s]Simon O'Rourke on carving chains[/ame]

 

Hope it helps

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