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"Moisture seeps out of wood once split? Sounds dumb but ..

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When wood is split does it loose quite a lot of moisture immediately,as it was held in the wood under pressure in the minute pores of the wood? If that is the case presumably a log say 6"x 6" x 10" split in half lenghtwise ( logs cut from 2.5 mtr long processing wood thats been seasoned for a yr) will not take very long to loose most of its moisture as long as humidity is not as damp as the log !!!

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When wood is split does it loose quite a lot of moisture immediately,as it was held in the wood under pressure in the minute pores of the wood?

 

It's not held under pressure but the reason it doesn't flow out is that it is held by capillary attraction so the moisture at the surface has to be removed by air before the stuff in the middle can migrate to the surface.

 

 

 

 

If that is the case presumably a log say 6"x 6" x 10" split in half lenghtwise ( logs cut from 2.5 mtr long processing wood thats been seasoned for a yr) will not take very long to loose most of its moisture as long as humidity is not as damp as the log !!!

 

I don't follow that completely but wood will continue to dry from a surface even in high humidity, albeit rather slowly, just consider how quickly a road dries after a summer shower and how it remains wet for a long time even on a clear day in winter.

 

I split my logs in May and they are lovely to burn, I brought home some 4" cord at the same time that had been seasoned for a year and left it in a low stack against a hedge, it had turned doty and absorbed moisture, burning very poorly. I must do a moisture test on a bit.

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well kinda, i used a log splitter on some timber and when the splitter was going in water or fluid comes pissing or dribbling out from the log

 

Yes that's the force of the splitter squeezing it out.

 

I did a simple experiment a few years ago forcing a knot free bit of pine though a cutter which was essentially a matrix of tapered holes such that where they overlapped sharp points split the wood before forcing it down the holes, like a potato chip cutter. With green wood it squeezed some water out before it locked solid. With bone dry wood the force was enough to crush the cells and force the wood through the holes.

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Is it not more to do with surface area?

 

You put your washing out on the clothes line and it drys in afternoon. You leave it in the washing basket and it doesn't dry.

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I saw Sainsburys selling bottled Birch water (as in tree sap) for £2 a bottle or £8/litre. It made me wonder if anyone has thought about passing logs through a giant industrial mangle to mechanically remove the water and then somehow the convert the drier solid mass back to something like a log to burn and sell the water to a I-Saw-You-Coming person. I suppose its a bit like wood pellets\logs.

 

Tastes rubbish by the way.

 

 

 

 

 

Sent from my Alba 10" using Tapatalk

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I have taken birch sap in the spring , from the living tree . Quite refreshing . Can also make wine from it I understand . Think its only the rising sap that is palatable though .

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Is it not more to do with surface area?

 

You put your washing out on the clothes line and it drys in afternoon. You leave it in the washing basket and it doesn't dry.

 

That's a different subject; yes it's the surface area exposed to a drying air flow that dictates how much water gets evaporated.

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I have taken birch sap in the spring , from the living tree . Quite refreshing . Can also make wine from it I understand . Think its only the rising sap that is palatable though .

Yeah, it's a very refreshing drink in the spring. I have made a bit of wine with it. Very tasty!

 

 

Sent from my E5823 using Arbtalk mobile app

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I saw Sainsburys selling bottled Birch water (as in tree sap) for £2 a bottle or £8/litre. It made me wonder if anyone has thought about passing logs through a giant industrial mangle to mechanically remove the water and then somehow the convert the drier solid mass back to something like a log to burn and sell the water to a I-Saw-You-Coming person. I suppose its a bit like wood pellets\logs.

 

Tastes rubbish by the way.

 

 

 

 

 

Sent from my Alba 10" using Tapatalk

Probably far too much energy used in that process to make it worthwhile.

 

Sent from my E5823 using Arbtalk mobile app

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