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Are wood burners getting smaller!!!

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Yep sure stoves are getting smaller. When we first started the main selling length was 10-12" now its 8-10". We do a sub 8" and this is all the short ends from processing and a lot of unsplit branch material. Maybe we should look at doing the quality as the rest just more expensive. What's frustrating is when delivery short logs I often see stoves that could take larger logs with ease. Cut all the logs for my folks and that's about 8 cube in the spring and now they have gone and bought a baby Burley :cursing:

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My boiler stove has an external air supply, picks up air from below the suspended floor. Cuts out draughts and works a treat! :thumbup1:

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Any woodburner over 5kw fitted now needs and external air source/vent. To aid combustion building regs. Basicly a hole in the wall to outside. pmsl

 

5.1 kw or above need vent, agreed, 5.0 kw and below then currently this depends on the age of the property and the air tightness.

 

It is though better to install a vent especially if you can install a direct air supply from outside into the stove. It removes any issues with differing air pressure between the room and the chimney top preventing the stove from pulling properly.

 

At the next review of the building regs I am expecting compulsory vents on all properties where double glazing is fitted. AT the moment this is advisory only under the British Standards but these are not a legal statute.

 

250mm logs will fit 95% of stoves out there, 200mm will fit them all as far as I know.

 

A

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Also " colder " air from out side is denser therefore you get more o2 so better combustion .

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Well, I've just checked mine, it's been in a year now and it's exactly the same size as it was when I fitted it.

 

I'll check again next year.

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I was wondering about doing that. Will building regs sign that off?
The guy who fitted the fire was HETAS approved so I think that his approval covers it. :thumbup1: I can't think of a reason that Building Regs wouldn't approve it.

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At the next review of the building regs I am expecting compulsory vents on all properties where double glazing is fitted. AT the moment this is advisory only under the British Standards but these are not a legal statute.

 

This will be all new properties I take it? Should be easy with a concrete block and beam floor which seem in vogue now.

 

What wood stoves are available room sealed, like gas boilers with balanced flues?

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I'm putting a stove in currently so have been reading Part J and my understanding is a vent pulling from under a suspended floor is fine. Its what I've done too....so I'll be peeved if building control have an issue. I don't 'need' it, its a stovax stockton 5, a 5kw stove, but i know a vent is good practice and a vent to directly by the stove, even if not connected to an OAK (outside air kit) means cold draughts across the room from some other leak/source of air are much less likely. so not only does the stove burn properly, the room is more comfy.

 

the 5kw cut off is a farce. that figure doesn't come from any tests and oddly enough its why lots of stoves that have a large firebox and can run at much higher power are rated to a nominal 5kw, as consumers like it, it avoid the part j necessity for a vent. a vent is good practice though. the sensible bit is the smoke chimney draw test....does it draw well? only trouble is alot of iffy installs could probably pass that test on a good day...a smoke pellet is perhaps not a great measure of draw but then its about the best practical test i guess.

 

my own house is probably a typical 1930s build, fairly leaky but changed over the years....originally with fireplaces in most rooms for coal fires, and air bricks in all rooms, but previous owners blocked up the fireplaces and put in central heating, then blocked up the draughty airbricks. then you get more damp/condensation. you install double glazing to cut down more draughts but get more condensation...you install bathroom and kitchen extractors to pull moisture out the house and prevent condensation. then i come along and want a stove....so i need to and have opened an air vent, added another vent in the back of the hearth from under the floor too. I do a chimney draw test and it passes but being belt and braces and having read part J i know to redo it with doors to extractor fans open and those fans running. i got it to pass that test too but not so easily...i had to warm the flue with a blow torch for 2 mins or else the kitchen extractor caused a reverse of flow and the smoke from the pellet came out the stove vent and filled the lounge. so although that test passes with a warm flue i'm also going to add another air vent in the kitchen wall to help the kitchen get its fresh air....I know from when i recently installed the kitchen that previous owners had blocked up 3 airbricks in the kitchen so putting one back is not going to be a bad thing....even though the kithcen doesn't have the range the house had when biult (so one should be enough i hope, not 3)

 

what i'm saying is, stoves need air and if you think it through carefully you can ensure they get it, in all circumstances, and in a way that doesn't cause cold draughts and comfort issues. I guess a good HETAS installer will know that...a good one.

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