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JohnSlogs

Imported kiln dry logs ?

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I've burned logs all my life, my father was burning logs long before me and still does. We were both shocked by how much better my kiln dried logs burn compared to any seasoned logs we have ever burnt.

 

You can say what you like about seasoned V kilned, I know which I prefer.

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Must admit cant see what the fuss is about calling sub 30% logs seasoned. Loads of guys knock out logs straight from "seasoned" roundwood where non of it's sub 30%. Barn dried, kiln dried, air dried ,seasoned all meaningless in the context of moisture content. Must admit was pretty surprised when CW sent a sample pack of their products and there "seasoned" logs were 40% which is not far from fresh cut. We guarantee average bellow 25% but the centre can be all of that but outside more like 16%. Cant get bellow 20% here in the depths of a soggy Dartmoor winter as the outside goes back up to 20-22%. All Air dried for what it's worth.

 

 

 

Yes thank you that was my point from the start that people couldn't understand. It doesn't matter what you call it, it has no relevance to the moisture content. That's why I've been banging on that I clearly advertise that it's an average of 30% so I'm not misleading anyone, not miss selling the product because "seasoned" or "kiln dried" is meaningless without a description. Maybe it's been drummed into you guys that seasoned has to be under 25% but not customers. My customers read my website and one says an average of 30% and the other 20%.

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I've burned logs all my life, my father was burning logs long before me and still does. We were both shocked by how much better my kiln dried logs burn compared to any seasoned logs we have ever burnt.

 

You can say what you like about seasoned V kilned, I know which I prefer.

 

But it is still a nonsense concept. Burn wood to dry wood. Given that wood will dry out when exposed to air for enough time, the creation of greenhouse gases to dry firewood is unnecessary and arguable morally and environmentally unjustifiable. I say this as the owner of a biomass kiln! :laugh1:

 

The UK has so little forest and so little timber, there has to be a better use for it than to dry something that would dry out by itself anyway.

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forestry commission have 20-30% everyone else is sub 25% why are you even bothering to post your not interested in what people think, when you look around at the other industry bodies they are pretty much in consensus at sub 25% your just trolling people.

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But it is still a nonsense concept. Burn wood to dry wood. Given that wood will dry out when exposed to air for enough time, the creation of greenhouse gases to dry firewood is unnecessary and arguable morally and environmentally unjustifiable. I say this as the owner of a biomass kiln! :laugh1:

 

The UK has so little forest and so little timber, there has to be a better use for it than to dry something that would dry out by itself anyway.

 

If you burn Willow,Pop,processor waste etc, for the kiln, timber that is generally not wanted and if left to rot will release just the same amount of carbon, there is no increase in carbon.

 

Also I recon there is a fair argument that more carbon may be released from the burning excess damp logs to compensate for their dampness, than would be from the kiln boiler :biggrin:

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forestry commission have 20-30% everyone else is sub 25% why are you even bothering to post your not interested in what people think, when you look around at the other industry bodies they are pretty much in consensus at sub 25% your just trolling people.

 

 

He's not trolling anyone!

If he's advertising by moisture content he's telling no lies.

It's just a different way of selling that you obviously disagree with.

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Also I recon there is a fair argument that more carbon may be released from the burning excess damp logs to compensate for their dampness, than would be from the kiln boiler :biggrin:

 

Be interesting to see a break down on this but working out the kWh used to dry the wood and wasted burning overly wet wood is beyond me.

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He's not trolling anyone!

If he's advertising by moisture content he's telling no lies.

It's just a different way of selling that you obviously disagree with.

 

:thumbup1:

 

Moisture contend is the only accurate way to describe how dry your wood is everything else is meaningless at present. Maybe there should be some guidelines but then it's nice not working in an overly regulated industry.

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Also I recon there is a fair argument that more carbon may be released from burning excessively damp logs to compensate for their dampness, than would be from the kiln boiler :biggrin:

 

How does a wet log contain more carbon than a dry one?

 

Quenched combusion will increase CO vs CO2 and UHCs, but gross LT emission of C will be the same.

Edited by TimberCutterDartmoor

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