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Old 02-03-09   #1 (permalink)
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Rigidoporus ulmarius

Rigidoporus ulmarius;
common bracket found on Willow, Elm and Horse Chestnut.
Sometimes mistaken for 'Perenniporia fraxinea' which favours Poplar, Elm and Ash.
Both have perenial brackets.

Although niether are on the Red data list of threatened brittish fungi,
P. fraxinea is thought to be somewhat rare.

The easy way to distinguish the difference, is when you cut a slice out.
P. fraxinea has flesh and tube layers of the same colour. Whereas Rigi has orange fading tubes which contrast sharply against the spongy white flesh.

Green algal and/or moss growth on the top surface is pretty typical.

Decay type is Brown cubicle rot.


Here are three Rigidoporus brackets hosted on Horse Chestnut.

.
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Last edited by David Humphries; 03-03-09 at 06:51 AM.. Reason: Decay Type added
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Old 02-03-09   #2 (permalink)
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Re: Rigidoporus ulmarius

Slices showing the orange tube layer of Rigi' and the buff spongy flesh.
This layer can be between 1 and 5mm deep.

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Old 02-03-09   #3 (permalink)
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Re: Rigidoporus ulmarius

Underside showing pores.

Apparantly there are 5 - 8 per mm. But that's getting far to anal.
Be wearing a lab coat and geeky specs next,

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Old 02-03-09   #4 (permalink)
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Re: Rigidoporus ulmarius

Great post & pics
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Old 02-03-09   #5 (permalink)
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Re: Rigidoporus ulmarius

According to my instructor on the PTI its quite rare up here, I've never seen it, he also said If you find one he'd like one for the class. Perhaps you could make money selling them to scottish colledges.
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Old 02-03-09   #6 (permalink)
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Re: Rigidoporus ulmarius

Found one on an Elm in South Lanarkshire. Used it for RFS ident
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Old 02-03-09   #7 (permalink)
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Re: Rigidoporus ulmarius

I know of a Rigidoporus bracket within the cavity of an ancient Yew. Havent seen or heard of it on Taxus before.
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Old 17-03-09   #8 (permalink)
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Re: Rigidoporus ulmarius

Just adding to the records...

Found 04.03.09 on its eponymous host (in this instance Ulmus procera)at the union of a major limb extending over a busy A-road. A proper inspection perhaps with some decay detection equipment will inform any reduction works.
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Old 18-03-09   #9 (permalink)
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Re: Rigidoporus ulmarius

Oooohhh nasty

Nice typical shot at the end Tony






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Some see nature all ridicule and deformity... and some scarce see nature at all.
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"
William Blake

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Old 27-06-09   #10 (permalink)
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Re: Rigidoporus ulmarius

Hi,

Good thread as have been struggling between the two. Ok so I think I know of a good size R.ulmarius bracket under a large limb on a chestnut in a local park (Will take pictures Monday). The limb is over a busy path in the park. As it’s a brown rot I would say it would be good to reduce/remove the limb pretty soon?

Cheers Steve

ps heres some pics I took a while back of i think R.ulmarius on a chestnut stump?
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